Search Results for: "brian fore"

Native American nations, Arizona sign new gaming compact

Andres Guerra Luz Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 Native American nations, Arizona sign new gaming compact Eight Arizona tribal leaders and Gov. Doug Ducey on Monday signed an agreement regarding a 14-year-old gaming compact. The new agreement allows Native American nations in Arizona to renegotiate their current agreements to expand gaming on tribal lands within the state of Arizona while restricting gaming facility construction within the Phoenix metro area. “It’s time for us to modernize this compact to meet the changing needs of the state and to increase the opportunities for tribal gaming,” Ducey said. Cronkite News video by Brian Fore Russell Begaye, president of the Navajo Nation, said in his keynote speech that the new compact signing benefits everyone, not just Native Americans. In an interview with Cronkite News after the compact signing, Begaye said Native American gaming revenue contributes around $100 million yearly to the state. The funds, he said, benefit Arizona teachers, trauma centers and tourism. Cronkite News video by Brian Fore Currently the Navajo Nation has one casino in Arizona , and Begaye could not provide information on how much money that casino will earn or give back to tribal members as a result of new gaming agreements. But he said Navajo casinos in New Mexico and Arizona provide $5 million annually to the Navajo Nation, and he said that number will increase with modernized casino...

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Will Trump presidency harm Nogales border economy?

Brian Fore Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 Will Trump presidency harm Nogales border economy? NOGALES, Ariz. – As President-elect Donald Trump prepares for his January inauguration, business owners here face new uncertainties. They’re worried about Trump’s campaign vows to build a border wall, his plan to modify trade agreements that benefit this region, his pledge to ramp up border security that might cause even longer wait lines at border crossings and the devaluation of the Mexican peso directly tied to Trump’s election, which hurts merchants in the area. The election comes just days before the Christmas season begins, a period when retailers see their highest sales for the year, due largely to shoppers from Mexico who help stimulate the local economy by staying in hotels and buying food, fuel and other goods. Olivia Ainza-Kramer, president and CEO of the Nogales-Santa Cruz Chamber of Commerce, chiefly expressed concerns about the economic impact of building a wall and ending the North American Free Trade Agreement, on the regional economy. The Morley Gate Border Station, a Nogales port of entry for pedestrians crossing into the U.S. (Photo by Zach Quinn/Cronkite News) “Most of our revenue comes from the Mexican consumers,” she said. Trump’s election had immediate effects on Mexico and the border. On Thursday, the value of the peso weakened to over 20 pesos per U.S. dollar, compared to about 16 pesos per...

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Will Prop. 205 help Arizona vets treat their PTSD with pot?

Brian Fore Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016 Will Prop. 205 help Arizona vets treat their PTSD with pot? TUCSON – The aroma of hot pizza fused with lingering marijuana smoke and Mick Jagger’s repeated cadence of “I can’t get no… sa-tis-fac-tion.” Posters of the “Periodic Table of Cannabis”, a “DONT [sic] TREAD ON WEED” Gadsden flag parody and other marijuana-themed pop culture memorabilia decorated the walls of the 420 Social Club. As Jagger sang on, authorized medical marijuana patients painted their own versions of “The Scream” by Edvard Munch. “Painting in a large group of people requires concentration and the ability to maintain your anxiety and your hypervigilance and, you know, maybe your increased fear of just being surrounded,” said Ricardo Pereyda, an Army veteran who started this monthly Buds and Brushes program for military veterans and others as “cannabis art therapy”. Pereyda is an enthusiastic supporter of Proposition 205 , which comes up for a vote on Nov. 8 and, if passed, will legalize recreational marijuana in Arizona. He believes, from his own experience, that marijuana is a safe and effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans. And even though veterans with PTSD can already legally obtain medical marijuana under Arizona’s medical marijuana law, Pereyda supports Prop. 205 because he believes that veterans with PTSD who use marijuana under the state medical marijuana law are penalized by...

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Latino organization to hold 2017 national convention in Phoenix

Brian Fore Friday, Oct. 7, 2016 Latino organization to hold 2017 national convention in Phoenix Seven years after organizing a 16-month boycott of Arizona over anti-immigration legislation, the National Council of La Raza will hold its 2017 national convention in Phoenix, NCLR president and CEO Janet Murguia said Friday. The national convention, scheduled to take place July 8-11 at the Phoenix Convention Center, will bring an “economic boom” to Phoenix, according to Murguia, as previous conferences have contributed at least $17 million each year to cities hosting the conferences, she said. NCLR launched nearly 50 years ago in Phoenix and works with nearly 300 affiliates across the country to provide resources and opportunities to Latinos. “That we started here is a testament to the civil rights legacy of this city, where leaders and organizations have worked for decades to ensure equal rights and equal opportunity for the millions of Hispanics who call Arizona home,” she said during the news conference at the Bank of America Tower. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and other guest speakers welcomed the announcement and addressed various issues that face Arizona’s Latino community. The announcement to host the national convention in Phoenix is big news for NCLR because the organization formally launched a boycott against Arizona in 2010 because of Arizona passing the controversial immigration law SB 1070, which NCLR claims has enabled and enforced racial...

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ASU Democrats race to register, lock in millennial voters for 2016 election

Danielle Quijada Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 ASU Democrats race to register, lock in millennial voters for 2016 election PHOENIX – Kaylan Fodor stood in the hot sun outside of the Arizona State University Memorial Union. Despite her efforts to stop them, students rushed past her. They were disinterested in her goal of helping the Democratic Party register 10,000 voters by Oct. 10. Millennials, she said, “will scream until they’re blue in the face on Facebook.” But many won’t vote. They won’t even register to vote. “I do think this is going to be a critical election for millennials to get out and vote because they are expressing their opinions all over social media, but it doesn’t mean anything unless they get out and put it on paper,” said Fodor, 21, an ASU student and member of the ASU Young Democrats. Registering eligible Millennial voters can be frustrating, even at ASU, which has more than 70,000 full-immersion students and a large pool of eligible voters. Millennials are disenchanted with both parties this election season, and although they trend Democratic the party is having difficulty locking in their votes. According to the Arizona Secretary of State website, the roster of registered Democrats has grown from just under 1 million in January 2015 to 1,019,050 today. Republicans continue to outnumber Democrats and register new voters in Arizona. In January 2015, there were...

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American DREAMer: Once undocumented, Latina activist is a citizen

Andres Guerra Luz Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016 American DREAMer: Once undocumented, Latina activist is a citizen PHOENIX – Seven years ago, when she graduated from Arizona State University with an engineering degree, Dulce Matuz couldn’t get an engineering job. The reason: Matuz was an undocumented immigrant. But that undocumented status didn’t stop Matuz from political organizing for immigrant rights, or from being named one of Time’s “The World’s 100 Most Influential People” in 2012 . On Monday, Matuz, 31, became an American citizen. She joined 131 other immigrants from 33 nations at a naturalization ceremony at Trevor G. Browne High School. About 700 students witnessed the event. When Matuz got her citizenship certificate, she smiled and waved an American flag. And then she walked outside the auditorium and registered to vote. In doing so, she challenged 473,000 unregistered Latino voters to join her in registering to vote in the presidential election. “I want to challenge them and motivate them and explain to them that it is very important that they get involved and they vote,” she said. “We want to create an Arizona that embraces diversity and immigrants instead of being in an Arizona that’s been recognized for anti-immigrant rhetoric and SB 1070,” Matuz said. Now a local realtor, Matuz remains active in the Arizona Dream Act Coalition , a youth movement that advocates for immigrant rights and education....

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Love and help: Latinos with disabilities overcome obstacles

Alejandro Barahona and Andres Guerra Luz Monday, Sept. 19, 2016 Love and help: Latinos with disabilities overcome obstacles PHOENIX – Eleven years ago, Jose Ortiz-Reyes fell off a scaffold and became paralyzed from the neck down. Gradually he regained the use of his upper body, but he’s still in a wheelchair. The secret to recovery, he said, is “love and help.” Ortiz-Reyes said Latinos with disabilities face many obstacles to receiving services. They include language barriers, immigration status, discrimination and self-acceptance. Not getting services results in some Latinos having a hard time accepting their own disabilities, he said. He said he considers himself fortunate because he speaks English fluently and is a U.S. citizen. Ortiz-Reyes, 62, is from San Luis, Sonora, Mexico. A former university professor, he migrated to the U.S. to be with his children. He was one of dozens of Latinos with disabilities who attended the Latino Disability Summit and Resource Fair on Saturday. Ortiz-Reyes said he is unemployed and wanted to learn what work is available for a Latino with a disability. Ideally he would love to teach, but he said he is willing to work at a hardware store in customer service. “Knowledge and information about disability doesn’t always reach the Spanish-speaking community as much as we’d want it to be able to do,” said Phil Pangrazio, the chief executive officer for Ability360, an advocacy...

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Az Dems: Hillary “deplorables” statement, pneumonia won’t hurt voter outreach

Brian Fore and Sarah Ann Niemann Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016 Az Dems: Hillary “deplorables” statement, pneumonia won’t hurt voter outreach PHOENIX – Melrose Brown, a 17-year-old African American high school student, moved to Phoenix two years ago from Minnesota. Since then, she said, she has witnessed several instances of racism. Once, when she was eating lunch, she said, a group of boys discussed how African Americans and other minority groups needed to return to their countries of origin. “When they spoke about those things, I felt hurt,” Brown said. That hurt prompted her to become active in politics, even though she can’t vote yet, because she believes policy can change hate. A former supporter of Democratic presidential primary candidate Bernie Sanders, Brown now supports Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. Recently, Brown joined 21 other volunteers in a class on how to register voters. The class was held at the Arizona Democratic Party headquarters in downtown Phoenix. Brown and several others attending the class said they were neither concerned nor worried that recent controversies surrounding Clinton would impact voter outreach and turnout. On Sept. 9, Clinton called half of the supporters of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump a “basket of deplorables ”, and on Sept. 11 she stumbled during a 9/11 ceremony in New York . Her campaign later revealed she had pneumonia. Like Brown, Frank Sacco, a 90-year-old retired...

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Arizona Democrats wary of Trump’s Phoenix immigration speech

Brian Fore Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016 Arizona Democrats wary of Trump’s Phoenix immigration speech PHOENIX – Ramon Chavez worries that if Donald Trump becomes president, his family, including his autistic brother, will be deported to Mexico. Regardless of what Trump may say Wednesday night about his immigration policy, Chavez is not convinced that the Republican presidential candidate will soften his original plan to implement mass deportation policies. “I am scared,” said the 23-year-old Phoenix College student, an undocumented immigrant and DREAMer who received temporary relief from deportation in 2012 under President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) executive action. Chavez spoke along with Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Arizona Rep. Rebecca Rios at a press conference held by Arizona Democratic leaders on Wednesday several hours before Trump’s immigration speech. He said, “[Trump] has promised that if he does become president, he will deport me, he will deport my brother and he will deport my parents.” Chavez said his family came to the United States before he was a teenager, in order to support him and his autistic brother. After Chavez graduated from high school, he said, his friends went to college but he was not able to attend himself. At the time, undocumented students were required to pay out-of-state-tuition at the state’s universities. “I wanted to go to school, I wanted to better myself and I wanted to...

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Arizona Latino immigrants seek citizenship to vote, fight discrimination

Brian Fore Monday, Aug. 29, 2016 Arizona Latino immigrants seek citizenship to vote, fight discrimination PHOENIX – Mexican immigrant Blanca Lorena Puente loves the United States, so much so that she is applying for citizenship in order to participate in the election process. She is among a group of Arizona Latino immigrants who say they are taking action to fight discrimination by becoming citizens and voting. Puente was one of about 120 lawful permanent residents who applied for citizenship at a fair in Phoenix recently. The event, hosted by the Arizona chapter of the national nonprofit Mi Familia Vota, may help stem a trend in low Latino voter turnout. Nationally, in the 2014 midterm election, only 27 percent of Latino voters voted , according to the Pew Research Center. The center reports that since 2012, “Hispanics, blacks, Asians and other minorities had a net increase of 7.5 million eligible voters, compared with a net increase of 3.2 million among non-Hispanic white eligible voters.” The center found that 26 percent of new Hispanic eligible voters are naturalized citizens. “[When] more Latinos start becoming U.S. citizens, elected officials have to listen to our values because we’re going to hold them accountable,” said Eduardo Sainz, deputy director of Mi Familia Vota Arizona. He said the nonprofit’s mission is to “ensure Latinos and immigrants work toward social and economic injustice” through voter registration,...

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Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s Criminal Contempt of Court Referral Sparks Contemplation, Rage

Andres Guerra Luz, Brian Fore and Katie Bieri Monday, Aug. 22, 2016 Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s Criminal Contempt of Court Referral Sparks Contemplation, Rage When Daniel Magos first learned Friday that a judge referred Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for criminal contempt of court prosecution, he felt a flood of relief and elation. And then he wept. Magos, 71, is a plaintiff in an ongoing class action civil rights federal lawsuit in which Arpaio and his department were found to have racially profiled Latino drivers and passengers in Maricopa County. On Friday, G. Murray Snow, the federal judge presiding over the case, ruled that Arpaio and three others be referred to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for prosecution of criminal contempt of court. The contempt of court ruling stems from the judge’s finding that Arpaio willfully violated several court orders. The violations included disobeying an order to stop enforcing immigration and failing to disclose evidence. For Magos, an American citizen who is a retired construction and maintenance worker and now works as a school crossing guard, the racial profiling case is personal. In an interview Monday at his home, where an American flag waves in front of the house, Magos said he was racially profiled and illegally stopped by one of Arpaio’s deputies in 2009, and is still afraid of law enforcement when he walks down...

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