Author: Jessi

Arizona is among top states that utilize renewable energy, report says

Jéssica Alvarado Gámez Wednesday, July 18, 2018 Arizona is among top states that utilize renewable energy, report says PHOENIX – The Environment Arizona & Policy Center released a report on Tuesday that focuses on how well the nation is utilizing renewable energy. Arizona has dramatically increased renewable energy production since 2008, the report said, and ranks high in several categories. Renewable energy is within reach, according to a news release from Environment Arizona. “The progress we’ve made in the last decade on renewable energy and technologies like battery storage and electric cars should give Arizonans the confidence that we can take clean energy to the next level,” Bret Fanshaw, solar program director, said in the statement. Environment Arizona, a nonprofit research and education organization dedicated to protecting the state’s air, water and open spaces, is part of the larger nonprofit Environment America. if(“undefined”==typeof window.datawrapper)window.datawrapper={};window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”]={},window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].embedDeltas={“100″:905,”200″:660,”300″:576,”400″:542,”500″:542,”700″:500,”800″:483,”900″:483,”1000”:483},window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].iframe=document.getElementById(“datawrapper-chart-wU5kq”),window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].iframe.style.height=window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].embedDeltas[Math.min(1e3,Math.max(100*Math.floor(window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].iframe.offsetWidth/100),100))]+”px”,window.addEventListener(“message”,function(a){if(“undefined”!=typeof a.data[“datawrapper-height”])for(var b in a.data[“datawrapper-height”])if(“wU5kq”==b)window.datawrapper[“wU5kq”].iframe.style.height=a.data[“datawrapper-height”][b]+”px”}); This story is part of Elemental: Covering Sustainability , a new multimedia collaboration between Cronkite News , Arizona PBS , KJZZ , KPCC , Rocky Mountain PBS and PBS SoCal . Subscribe to Cronkite News on...

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Tribal leaders tell Senate voting barriers are persistent, systemic

Bryan Pietsch Tuesday, July 17, 2018 Tribal leaders tell Senate voting barriers are persistent, systemic WASHINGTON – Native Americans have been “systematically denied access to fair representation” as a result of persistent barriers to voting, advocates and tribal leaders told a Senate roundtable Tuesday. Witnesses told the informal meeting of senators from the Indian Affairs and Rules committees that tribal voters face a range of challenges, from language barriers, to restrictions with mail-in ballots and lack of access to voting locations. Many of those issues are rooted in “blatant discrimination,” one speaker said. “We should not have to talk about blatant discrimination,” said Jackson Brossy, the executive director of the Navajo Nation Washington Office. “Here we are in 2018. We still face many, many unacceptable barriers to voting for Navajo people.” Sen. Tom Udall, D-New Mexico, said those barriers represent what he called an “insidious” effort to suppress the Native vote more than 50 years after passage of the Voting Rights Act. “To this day … many states and local jurisdictions have found new, more insidious ways to impose barriers on Native access to the ballot box,” Udall said, “from voter ID laws to inadequate polling and registration sites, to lack of availability of Native language ballot materials.” The Navajo Nation was just one of the tribes represented at the hearing, which featured Native American representatives from Alaska to...

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Trump reversal on Russia doesn’t come soon enough for Arizona lawmakers

Sarabeth Henne Tuesday, July 17, 2018 Trump reversal on Russia doesn’t come soon enough for Arizona lawmakers WASHINGTON – Arizona lawmakers agreed that President Donald Trump was wrong to claim Monday that Russia did not interfere in the 2016 election, although their reactions to the since-withdrawn statement ranged from condemnation to rationalization. Trump sparked immediate backlash Monday after appearing with Russian President Vladimir Putin and saying he saw no reason why Russia would have interfered in the election, noting Putin’s “extremely strong and powerful denial” of any involvement. The joint news conference in Finland followed a summit between the two men that came just days after the Justice Department announced the indictment of 12 Russians for hacking in connection with the election. Back at the White House Tuesday, Trump backtracked, saying he meant to say he did not see any reason why it “wouldn’t” have been Russia behind the alleged election hacking. “I accept our intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election took place,” he said in brief remarks before a meeting. But that did little to quiet critics from both sides of the aisle, who characterized his Monday remarks as everything from “nothing short of treason” to a failure to recognize the “seriousness of the nature of Russia meddling in our elections.” Some of the swiftest and harshest criticism came from Arizona’s two Republican senators....

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Study: Arizona No. 43 in voter turnout; minorities, youth and poor are hurt most

Conrad Romero Tuesday, July 17, 2018 Study: Arizona No. 43 in voter turnout; minorities, youth and poor are hurt most PHOENIX – Voter participation is eroding across the U.S. and the situation in Arizona is a crisis, according to a study by the Morrison Institute of Public Policy at Arizona State University. The poor, minorities and young adults who would benefit the most by voting are the very groups that participate the least in the process, the study said, recommending engagement be fostered through education Local leaders in justice and politics agreed that the situation in Arizona is bad and needs to be addressed, but several noted that the trend toward lower turnout is a historical problem consistent from generation to generation. Arizona ranks 43rd in the nation in voter turnout, and younger and poorer voters continue to not exercise their right to vote, according to the study, released at a press conference Tuesday by the Arizona Clean Elections Commission and the Morrison Institute. The study says voters usually are more affluent than non-voters, pointing to education level and economic status as factors that create interest in governmental policy. The institute aims to raise awareness of low voter turnout to turn the trend around. In Arizona, only 58 percent of registered voters turn out on average. “Those with low levels of education, ethnic minorities and young adults are woefully...

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