Author: Jessi

Drought hangover: ‘OK’ snowpack in Colorado won’t be enough to replenish reservoirs

Luke Runyon Monday, Jan. 21, 2019 Drought hangover: ‘OK’ snowpack in Colorado won’t be enough to replenish reservoirs GREELEY, Colo. – After one of the hottest and driest years on record, the Colorado River and its tributaries across the Southwest are likely headed for another year of low water. That’s according to an analysis by the Western Water Assessment at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Jeff Lukas, the researcher who authored the briefing , urged water managers throughout the Colorado River watershed to brace themselves for diminished streams and a decreasing likelihood of filling reservoirs left depleted by nearly two decades of drought. The analysis relies on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, among other agencies. That dire prognosis comes even as much of the Southern Rocky Mountains have seen a regular cycle of snowstorms this winter. “The snowpack conditions for Colorado and much of the Intermountain West don’t look too bad,” Lukas said. “They range from ‘meh’ to ‘OK.’” Snowpack that feeds the Colorado River ranges from 75 percent to 105 percent of normal. Snowpack in the entire Upper Basin – Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming – is sitting at about 90 percent of normal for this time of year. So with an “OK” snowpack in the Upper Basin, which supplies most of the water...

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Asian-Americans working to make their voices heard in Arizona

Vivian Meza Monday, Jan. 21, 2019 Asian-Americans working to make their voices heard in Arizona PHOENIX – On a cool November evening in a warehouse on the edge of downtown, Vicente J. Reid moves through the crowd at an Asian film festival in a sleek black suit, crisp white shirt and silver bolo tie encrusted with turquoise stones. He greets everyone as if he has known them for years – and, chances are, he has. Reid, a Filipino-American raised by a single mother in a heavily Latino neighborhood of Phoenix, helped organize the film festival as a fundraiser for a program that provides legal services to families facing deportation. It’s part of his mission to help Asians in a state where they make up just 3.5 percent of the population, where they don’t often see themselves in positions of power – where, he feels, they are often overlooked. “It ties into our ego, and ties into this ideal of, ‘If there’s no one that looks like me, how can I do it?'” Reid says. “For a lot of us, we’re the first ones to be doing certain things.” To Reid, it is time that Asians make their voices heard in Arizona, and the best way to do that is to elect more of them to public office. “Asian Americans are a true combination of Asian and American. We’re the...

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Arizonans travel to D.C. for ‘powerful and electrifying’ Women’s March

Andrew Howard Saturday, Jan. 19, 2019 Arizonans travel to D.C. for ‘powerful and electrifying’ Women’s March WASHINGTON – The crowd was smaller and the emotions may have been less raw, but for the thousands who turned out Saturday for the Women’s March in Washington, the event was still “powerful and electrifying.” “Washington is a city where change happens, it is important that we have bodies here,” said Zoe Isaac, a Scottsdale resident who joined thousands packing Freedom Plaza, about halfway between the White House and Trump International Hotel. The day began with a short march past the hotel before returning to the plaza for hours of speeches, many aimed at President Donald Trump and his administration. Trump was the spark for the original Women’s March, when hundreds of thousands of women descended on the National Mall one day after the president’s inauguration for a star-studded protest. Sister rallies in cities around the country and the globe boosted the number into millions, organizers said. Saturday’s march was a much smaller affair, moved off the Mall and with fewer high-profile speakers. But many were like Scottsdale resident Cathy Howard, who said it was important to come to Washington “to support women.” “I hope people will become more aware of how important women are in our country and how we can speak out and change things and make the world a better...

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March for Life draws upbeat pro-life crowd on chilly Washington day

Micah Alise Bledsoe and Luv Junious Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 March for Life draws upbeat pro-life crowd on chilly Washington day WASHINGTON – After 46 years, the March for Life remains the largest pro-life rally in the country. But to former Arizona resident Cheryl Kubacz, it’s about more than abortion. “This is the largest and longest sustainable march for civil rights that is consistent year after year, after year,” said Kubacz, an Arizona State University alumna now living on the East Coast. Kubacz was among the tens of thousands who turned out Friday for the 46th annual March for Life to sing, pray and listen to speeches criticizing the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that recognized a woman’s right to an abortion. The march was the highlight of a day of activities that included religious services and a dinner that featured a promised appearance by Vice President Mike Pence, who phoned in a message to the thousands who gathered on the National Mall – along with a surprise message from President Donald Trump. The crowd marched down Constitution Avenue from the Mall to the front of the Supreme Court carrying signs that read “Pro-life is pro-woman,” “We Vote Pro-life!” and, for the many students in the crowd, “We are the pro-life generation.” Many carried signs with the theme of this year’s march, “unique from day one,” a...

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