Author: Jessi

In Focus, episode 6: What homelessness means for pregnant women and LGBTQ youth

Brooke Ramos Friday, April 21, 2017 In Focus, episode 6: What homelessness means for pregnant women and LGBTQ youth There are nearly 10,000 homeless people in the state of Arizona, including veterans, the elderly, individuals, youth and families. In this episode of In Focus, we explore issues that especially affect two populations of homeless young adults: pregnant women and those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. Ten percent of homeless women are pregnant, according to an article published in the Maternal and Child Health Journal , and the Williams Institute estimates that 20 to 40 percent of homeless youth come from the LGBT community. We hear from one mother who found herself struggling with an addiction, homeless and pregnant with her fifth child, and why LGBT youth are disproportionately represented in homeless populations. The In Focus theme song is called “Wounds (Remix)” by Ketsa , used under Creative Commons . Jaime Tafoya is a mother of 5 from Long Beach, California who moved here to Phoenix in 2013. Her transition to this new place didn’t go as smoothly as she hoped. “I was dealing with a methamphetamine addiction, which I had been struggling with for the past 19 years,” Tafoya said. Soon after moving to Arizona, Tafoya spent six months in prison after being charged with two counts of forgery. Upon her release she became homeless while dealing...

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April 21, 2017: Social Refresh

Caity Hemmerle Friday, April 21, 2017 April 21, 2017: Social Refresh Social Refresh: Cronkite News top broadcast stories of the week In this week’s top Cronkite News broadcast coverage, Adriana de Alba reports on a Tempe company that wants to make the Border Wall more sustainable. Nicole Gutierrez attended the “New Voices” forum , which brought together representatives and their constituents to discuss how they can better involve themselves in the community, specifically the Hispanic community. Kanak Jha reports on why rose growing is a lucrative business despite Arizona’s heat. The expansion of the Empowerment Scholarship Account school voucher program in Arizona, which would allow students to use taxpayer dollars to pay private-school tuition or for other educational expenses, has many different impacts. Mckenna Delgarno covers how this may affect two families , and Joe Constantin reports on the potential pros and cons for schools and students in Arizona. Watch the full video for more of Cronkite News top broadcast stories of the...

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‘March for Science’ events expected to draw thousands in Arizona

Joseph Guzman Thursday, April 20, 2017 ‘March for Science’ events expected to draw thousands in Arizona WASHINGTON – Organizers of the March for Science events scheduled around the country Saturday said they are compelled to march – something scientists don’t normally do – to defend their work against critics and their programs against budget-cutters. “A lot of scientists feel like their funding is threatened and their voice is being extinguished by policy makers who are not paying attention to science,” said Sedona Maniak, a wildlife biologist and organizer for the march in Phoenix. The march was inspired by the post-inaugural Women’s March against President Donald Trump and scheduled to coincide with Earth Day – facts not lost on critics who are calling the events little more than “politics disguised as science.” The first-of-their-kind marches are scheduled for more than 500 locations around the globe, including events in Phoenix, Tucson, Flagstaff and Lake Havasu City, which are expected to draw thousands of people across the state. Maniak said the Phoenix event is expected to draw more than 5,000 people, which organizers are calling the biggest coordinated effort they have seen involving science of all disciplines. Maniak said politicians who deny climate change and have been hostile to the EPA have motivated those in the science community who traditionally do not speak out to march. “It has come to a point...

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Advocates criticize Latino vendors for bids on ‘shameful’ border wall

Andres Guerra Luz Thursday, April 20, 2017 Advocates criticize Latino vendors for bids on ‘shameful’ border wall WASHINGTON – Some Hispanic-owned companies on the list of “interested vendors” for the construction of a U.S.-Mexico border wall say they are facing a backlash from Latino advocates who call the project “shameful” and “wrong.” Even though the contracts could be worth billions – estimates range from $21.6 billion to as much as $70 billion – advocates say contractors should pass on the job if it means helping construct a wall that “represents racism” and divides families across the border. “There are certain things morally that we shouldn’t accept. This is one of them,” said Lydia Camarillo, vice president of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project. That reaction did not surprise James Garcia, a spokesman for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, which officially opposes the wall but takes no position on whether contractors should bid on it. “It’s probably safe to say that it’s not going to be received favorably in the immigrants’ rights community,” Garcia said of the wall project. A total of 308 companies, including 22 from Arizona, made the early April deadline to be included on the list of vendors interested in the first phase of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection project. That first phase will seek bids for the construction of wall prototypes, 30 feet long...

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April 20, 2017 Newscast

Thursday, April 20, 2017 April 20, 2017 Newscast Rethinking NAFTA, composting in Phoenix and desert roses Cronkite News reports on another Arizona company’s border wall design submission, a nonprofit working to combat drug abuse in the Latino community and the effect of school vouchers on rural Arizona...

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