Category: Peach Springs

PEDESTRIAN FATALITY ON ROUTE 66

   A pedestrian was killed Monday, Feb. 13, when struck by a vehicle outside the northern Arizona community of Peach Springs. The Department of Public Safety said the accident on Route 66 occurred at 6:08 a.m.    DPS said Brandon Crozier, 39, Peach Springs, was in the roadway when he was struck by an eastbound vehicle. Crozier was dead at the scene of the accident.    The driver of the vehicle was treated for minor injuries. The accident investigation is...

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RIFLE ASSAULT NETS PRISON TERM

  A Peach Springs resident who is a member of the Havasupai Tribe has been sentenced to prison after pleading guilty to assault with a dangerous weapon. Lonewolf Deray Havatone, 34, was given a 59 month prison term October 24 by U.S. District Judge John J. Tuchi. Havatone had previously pleaded guilty to assault with a dangerous weapon.  The 59-month sentence reflects a five-month reduction for the time Havatone spent in tribal custody for the same incident. On Sept. 23, 2014, Havatone, a convicted felon, assaulted the victim, a member of the Hualapai tribe, by striking her with a...

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ANGIUS ALONE IS UNOPPOSED

Hildy Angius is the only Mohave County Supervisor who is running unopposed in the current election cycle. The District 2 republican is the only incumbent who drew no challengers by the June 1 nominating petition filing deadline. A total of 16 others are running for supervisor in the county’s four other districts. Buster Johnson, the most tenured member of the current board, will face Gary Kellogg, Martin Brown and George Schnittgrund in the republican primary in August. The winner would face former republican Cassandra Mooneyham who advances to the November general election as the only Independent contender in District...

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River Insect Study

tive Flows Might Mitigate Negative Impacts The decline of aquatic insects downstream from some hydroelectric dams has been linked to a widespread practice known as hydropeaking, whereby river flows are increased during the day when electricity demands are large, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey, along with researchers from Oregon State University, Utah State University and Idaho State University. Findings show it may be possible to mitigate these negative effects by using alternative hydropower practices.Aquatic insects play an essential role in river food webs and are the main food source for countless species of fish, birds, bats and other wildlife. This study identified how abrupt water level changes affect aquatic insects in every stage of life, which is an important step toward understanding how to potentially improve river health downstream of hydropeaking dams throughout the world. The research was based in part on a large citizen science project with more than 2,500 insect samples taken on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, downstream of Glen Canyon Dam. This dataset was collected almost entirely by river guides, educational groups, and other citizen scientists. Researchers also tested the effects of abrupt water levels changes on river health by comparing insect diversity across 16 large dammed rivers in the western United States that vary in the degree of hydropeaking. The full report is available online in the...

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Local Election Notes

Mohave County voters approved both statewide ballot measures in Tuesday’s special election. Results are unofficial pending ongoing vote processing and the election canvas. Tabulation of nearly 27,000 votes reveals county voters favoring passage of proposition 123 (14,960-11,778). Prop 124 is passing in Mohave County (16,610-9,785). Unofficial results place three men and two women on the new board of the Lake Mohave Ranchos Fire District: Steve Berg                       228 David Anthony                 223 Eric Terrill                        215 Charlotte Kiffer                213 Debora Cass                  ...

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