Category: California

NEEDLES RAPE ARREST

  The San Bernardino County Sheriff’s office reports the arrest of an alleged sex offender. The rape reportedly occurred on September 11 in Needles. An investigation led to the arrest last Thursday of John Garcia Sr. The suspect was booked into jail at the Colorado River Station on a rape...

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I-40 MOTORIST ADVISORY

Maintenance crews will be repairing sections of roadway along a five-mile stretch of Interstate 40 near the California border (mileposts 3-8), approximately 10 miles south of the Lake Havasu City traffic interchange, Friday (July 29) during daylight hours, according to the Arizona Department of Transportation. Motorists should expect brief delays for intermittent lane closures in both east- and westbound lanes. ADOT advises travelers to observe reduced speeds, and to watch for crews and equipment in the work zone. ADOT works to inform the public about planned roadway restrictions, but there is a possibility that unscheduled closures or restrictions may...

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ENERGY CORRIDOR ASSESSMENT

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) recently released a study that provides a foundation for upcoming regional reviews of energy corridors on western public lands to assess the need for revisions and provide greater public input regarding areas that may be well suited for transmission siting. The regional reviews will begin with priority corridors in southern California, southern Nevada and western Arizona, and provide more opportunities for collaboration with the public and Federal, Tribal, state and local governmental stakeholders. The study examines whether the energy corridors established under Section 368(a)...

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River Insect Study

tive Flows Might Mitigate Negative Impacts The decline of aquatic insects downstream from some hydroelectric dams has been linked to a widespread practice known as hydropeaking, whereby river flows are increased during the day when electricity demands are large, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey, along with researchers from Oregon State University, Utah State University and Idaho State University. Findings show it may be possible to mitigate these negative effects by using alternative hydropower practices.Aquatic insects play an essential role in river food webs and are the main food source for countless species of fish, birds, bats and other wildlife. This study identified how abrupt water level changes affect aquatic insects in every stage of life, which is an important step toward understanding how to potentially improve river health downstream of hydropeaking dams throughout the world. The research was based in part on a large citizen science project with more than 2,500 insect samples taken on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, downstream of Glen Canyon Dam. This dataset was collected almost entirely by river guides, educational groups, and other citizen scientists. Researchers also tested the effects of abrupt water levels changes on river health by comparing insect diversity across 16 large dammed rivers in the western United States that vary in the degree of hydropeaking. The full report is available online in the...

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100 Park Service Celebration

As the National Park Service celebrates 100 years of protecting and preserving the nation’s parks and monuments, everyone is encouraged to get out and #FindYourPark during National Park Week, April 16-24. All National Park Service entrance fees will be waived for the week and plenty of free activities and festivities will take place at Lake Mead National Recreation Area and other national parks. “We have an amazing variety of special events taking place during the centennial,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Some commemorate our first hundred years, but many others look to the future, to the...

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