Category: Cronkite News

Gun sales in state start to climb back up after January’s Trump slump

Alexis Egeland Friday, April 28, 2017 Gun sales in state start to climb back up after January’s Trump slump WASHINGTON – Gun sales in Arizona have started to rebound after a brief January slump that experts attribute to the inauguration of President Donald Trump. The latest FBI background check data show that gun sales in Arizona last year peaked at 44,887 in December, before plunging to 31,366 in January. That mirrored national sales, which hit a high of 2.8 million in December before falling to just over 2 million a month later. But sales in March had bounced back to 38,170 in Arizona and 2.4 million nationally. The numbers are just the latest in a rollercoaster ride of gun sales driven up by what experts said were typical reactions to the possible election of a Democrat, Hillary Clinton, and a subsequent drop when gun-friendly Republican Trump moved into the White House. The sensitivity to partisan politics is one of the few things predictable about gun sales, one expert said – along with the general upward trend over time. “The gun-sale market is really volatile,” said Larry Gould, law professor at Coconino Community College and expert on police policies and procedures. “If you look back over the last 17, 18 years you see that it goes up and down, up and down, but the general trend has been upward.” Marc...

Read More

FEC: Arizonans gave $1.5 million toward Trump’s $107 million inaugural

Dustin Quiroz Friday, April 28, 2017 FEC: Arizonans gave $1.5 million toward Trump’s $107 million inaugural WASHINGTON – Arizona residents donated $1.5 million toward President Donald Trump’s record-breaking inauguration fund, dwarfing the $26,000 that Arizonans gave to the last inauguration of President Barack Obama, according to Federal Election Commission reports. The bulk of the Arizona money came from Godaddy.com founder Bob Parsons, who gave $1 million, while the other 12 came from businesses and individuals – some of whom were not even aware that their purchase of Trump memorabilia were being counted toward the inauguration “It wasn’t a donation,” said Ioanna Morfessis, a Phoenix resident listed as one of the donors. “I bought five inaugural plates, $50 each.” Calls to others who listed Arizona there address went to businesses that said they had never heard of the donor. The Huffington Post reported this week that the inaugural committee conceded errors in its filings, and experts said the Arizona problems are common in campaign financing reports. The FEC last week released a 500-page list of donors for the 58th Inaugural Committee, far less than the 5,425-page report from Obama’s second inauguration. But Obama raised just $44 million compared to the $107 million reported by Trump. Daniel Weiner, senior counsel for the Brennan Center’s Democracy Program, said Trump was able to raise so much from relatively few donors but doing away...

Read More

Social Refresh: April 28, 2017

Kayla Becton Friday, April 28, 2017 Social Refresh: April 28, 2017 Social Refresh: Top Cronkite News broadcast stories of the week Would you drive five miles on an unpaved road to visit a bar in the middle of the desert? Cronkite News reporter Alexa Armes visits one off-the-grid oasis that offers a unique experience for anyone wanting a drink. While many budget changes have caused schools to cut arts programs, one Valley school is celebrating the expansion of an arts program with the construction of a new building. Danielle Kerncamp brings the highlights from the groundbreaking festivities on-site. Thousands of Arizona children benefit from federally funded free and reduced lunch programs at school, but some schools get more money for these free lunches than they end up using. What happens with these extra funds? Reporter Natalie Tarangioli lets us know. View these and other top highlights from this week’s Cronkite News...

Read More

Changing landscapes, rising temperatures in Maricopa county

Courtney Columbus Friday, April 28, 2017 Changing landscapes, rising temperatures in Maricopa county PHOENIX – The ground is 9 degrees hotter at night in Chandler and Gilbert than it was at the turn of the century, as increases in population and development in those areas resulted in changes in land use, according to a 2016 study. Arizona State University researcher Chuyuan Wang used satellites to study land surface temperatures across the Valley from 2000 to 2014, finding the highest increases in nighttime temperatures in the southeastern reaches of the metro area. View the project here “For the existing developed areas, we did not see an increasing or decreasing trend in land surface temperature,” Wang said. “We found a dramatic change of the land use, land cover, like desert or croplands or vegetative, like grasslands, into developed area, residential, business, commercial, those kinds of things. That’s the reason why it caused the temperature to increase.” From 2015 to 2016, Maricopa County had the fastest annual growth rate of any U.S. county — adding an average of 222 people per day, according to the Census Bureau. But the county’s rapid growth — both in population and in the developed size of the metro area — dates back more than 50 years, and has brought substantial environmental changes to the Valley. In 1950, the Phoenix and Avondale urban areas occupied just 55...

Read More

Mining expansion leaves Florence community uneasy

Kaly Nasiff Friday, April 28, 2017 Mining expansion leaves Florence community uneasy FLORENCE – Arizona’s economy has been built historically on the 5 c’s: cotton, citrus, cattle, climate and copper. The state’s mining industry – Arizona makes up 65 percent of copper production in the United States – employs about 11,000 people and generates thousands of jobs in connected industries. But the industry has been battling permitting issues and environmental concerns, especially in Florence, where residents have been working for eight years to block a copper mine View the project here The Florence Copper Project is an underground copper recovery site that is in development in Florence. The in-situ copper recovery (ISCR) process occurs between 400 to 1,200 feet underground, where a mixture of 99.5 percent water and 0.5 percent sulfuric acid dissolves copper into the bedrock. Then the copper solution is pumped to the surface and processed into copper cathode sheets. Florence Copper is one of three ISCR sites under development in Arizona. The others are Gunnison Copper Project near Wilcox and the Van Dyke project in the Globe-Miami district. Gunnison is owned by the Excelsior Mining Corporation and Van Dyke is owned by a subsidiary of Copper Fox Metals Inc. Both companies, and Taseko, which owns Florence Copper, are based in Canada. In-situ recovery is most commonly used for uranium mining and accounted for 48 percent of...

Read More