Category: Cronkite News

Dec. 7, 2018 Newscast

Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 Dec. 7, 2018 Newscast Arizona dairy farmers worry about Trump’s trade deal with Canada and Mexico; spring training renovations at Maryvale Baseball Park; and more

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Native Americans hope to protect ancestral sites threatened by multibillion-dollar copper mine

Daisy Finch Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 Native Americans hope to protect ancestral sites threatened by multibillion-dollar copper mine TONTO NATIONAL FOREST – LeRoy Shingoitewa dug his hiking boots into loose gravel and sand, watching the early November morning sunlight slowly spread across shrubby hills and rocky valleys near the proposed site of an enormous copper mine. Resolution Copper plans to develop the mine east of Superior and predicts the mine will meet about a quarter of the nation’s demand for copper once it is in full production. The company says the mine, which may cost as much as $8 billion, is the “largest single investment in Arizona history .” It has been passionately opposed by some Native Americans who say it will destroy a sacred site near Oak Flat Campground in the Tonto National Forest about 70 miles east of Phoenix. The Resolution Copper-Oak Flat controversy is not lost on Shingoitewa, even though he’s a field director for a team of Native American “tribal monitors” chosen for a program funded by Resolution Copper and designed with help from the U.S. Forest Service. The monitors are charged with documenting culturally significant Native American sites that could be affected by the mine, which is expected to cover 11 square miles. They hope their work will help save at least some of what’s at stake – the ancestral lands and cultural resources...

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Pulling no punches: 14-year-old girl aspires to be first Navajo boxer to win Olympics

Isaac Colindres Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 Pulling no punches: 14-year-old girl aspires to be first Navajo boxer to win Olympics CHINLE – Even with modern technology, it’s nearly impossible to find the homemade boxing gym identified by a tattered wooden sign that reads, “Damon-Bahe Boxing Gym.” In and around this small town on the Navajo Reservation, house numbers rarely exist. And Google Maps can’t quite explain that, off Indian Route 7, less than a quarter mile west of the Chevron gas station, there’s a dirt road that, after three right turns, leads to the gym and another sign, this one warning “Beware of Dog.” The modest gym, which was built on a patch of land once dedicated to raising goats, now is dedicated to the Olympic-size dreams of a 14-year-old Navajo girl, Mariah Bahe. These dreams take root in reality. Bahe is the reigning Arizona State Junior Olympics champion and qualified for the 2018 Elite and Youth National Championships and Junior and Prep Open in Salt Lake City. She competes Friday in the 95-pound junior class for females. But on this day, Bahe polishes her boxing skills in a compact space about the size of a one-bedroom apartment. To one side is a fun-size ring with ragged ropes and a carpet floor. Squeezed into the remaining space are a speed bag, several heavy bags and other expected pieces of...

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A battle beneath the waves: Purple urchins thrive, starving out red urchins used in sushi

Emily Fohr Friday, Dec. 7, 2018 A battle beneath the waves: Purple urchins thrive, starving out red urchins used in sushi SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – Boats bobbed on a gentle current as Jeff Maassen, a sea-urchin diver for 30 years, filled up his fuel tank at the wharf. He waved to fellow fishermen, then set out for the Channel Islands off Santa Barbara, where he would dive for the next few days. Maassen harvests red sea urchins, which he sells to processors in Oxnard, Long Beach and Los Angeles. Sushi restaurants prepare the urchins as uni, a delicacy that comes from the meaty gonads of red sea urchins. But Maassen and other divers aren’t harvesting as many red sea urchins because climate change has raised ocean temperatures, allowing the purple sea urchin to thrive along the California coast. Purple sea urchins, which are not harvested for human consumption, devour the kelp forests, leaving nothing for red sea urchins. “We’re seeing more El Niños. We’re seeing warmer water currents dominating our coastal ecosystem, and that’s changing everything as we used to know it,” Maassen said. “The red sea urchins are starving to death. Everything’s getting stressed right now because of a lack of food and a lack of healthy ecosystem.” Jenn Caselle, a research biologist at the Marine Science Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said California coastal...

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Dec. 6, 2018 Newscast

Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018 Dec. 6, 2018 Newscast Newly recruited Spanish speaking detention officers; immigrants seeking asylum; and more from our borderlands reporters.

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