Category: Cronkite News

In Focus DACA Special Report: Episode 5

Adrienne St. Clair and Andrew Nicla Friday, Nov. 24, 2017 In Focus DACA Special Report: Episode 5 On one side of the debate are the people who are demanding protection for those covered by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. They march. They chant. They protest. On the other side, opponents are just as convinced of their positions. But maybe not as loud. Our theme song is “Zoo Bells” and we also heard “Lost The Raid,” both by Roddy Nikpour . In this fifth episode of our In Focus DACA Special Report, we speak with those lawmakers and others who think the Trump administration is right to do away with DACA in its current form. They told us they think there are alternative ways to protect DACA recipients, or “DREAMers,” those immigrants who were brought to this country illegally as children and may know no other home. But they’re not convinced the DREAM Act is the best solution, and some, at least, are calling for Democrats to work on a compromise measure. But some Democrats, and many DACA recipients, continue to insist the only possible solution is a “clean” DREAM Act, one that does not include language on a border wall, interior enforcement or other immigration issues. We also talk to policy experts who help us break down the political game of chicken the two sides are engaged...

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ASU rescinds Cronkite Award given to Charlie Rose in 2015

Staff Friday, Nov. 24, 2017 ASU rescinds Cronkite Award given to Charlie Rose in 2015 The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication rescinded the 2015 award of excellence given to news anchor Charlie Rose after the longtime anchor was accused of several instances of sexual misconduct. Christopher Callahan, dean of the school, announced the decision Friday in a letter to the Cronkite School community. Each year, the school bestows the Walter Cronkite Award of Excellence in Journalism to a journalist who exemplifies the qualities of the school’s namesake. Rose, was given the 32nd edition of the award in 2015. On Monday, the Washington Post released a story detailing sexual misconduct by Rose against eight women. Rose was fired as co-anchor of “CBS This Morning” and PBS ended its relationship with Rose’s company, which produced the “Charlie Rose” show. Here is the full text of Callahan’s letter: The Cronkite School is rescinding the Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism given to Charlie Rose in 2015. This unprecedented action is taken with the utmost seriousness and deliberation. We are not in the business of trying to rewrite history. The Cronkite Award is bestowed each year to celebrate a great journalist, our school, our students, our alumni and our profession. It is a lifetime achievement award. It does not come with term limits. It is given in perpetuity. The...

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Trans Queer Pueblo organizes Phoenix show giving support to LGBTQ immigrant community

Alex Valdez Friday, Nov. 24, 2017 Trans Queer Pueblo organizes Phoenix show giving support to LGBTQ immigrant community PHOENIX — Growing up as a member of the LGBTQ community can already be a struggle for many. For some Latino youths, their journey is made even more difficult because of several factors such as the conservative, male dominated and religious nature of their culture. These are some of the reasons why members of Trans Queer Pueblo , a local LGBTQ activist organization, came together to organize their fifth annual ‘Drag for a Dream,’ an event geared toward lending support and raising funds for the Hispanic immigrant LGTBQ community in the Valley. Aron Castillo, who is undocumented, has been with TQP for the past five years and said the group has opened many doors to him that were once slammed shut. Aron Castillo takes the stage to perform his routine at the fifth annual ‘Drag for a Dream.’ (Photo by Alex Valdez/Cronkite News) “I am a transgender Mexicano and right now it is very important for us to be visual, especially at this time for transgender lives,” Castillo said. It all started five months ago when Castillo embarked on a journey he said has been both exhilarating and terrifying. Since Castillo does not have a legal migratory status, he did not know where to turn to begin his transition. That is...

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Advocates worry FCC changes to Lifeline could hit Indian Country hard

Isaac Windes Friday, Nov. 24, 2017 Advocates worry FCC changes to Lifeline could hit Indian Country hard WASHINGTON – The Federal Communications Commission is moving to rein in a low-cost telephone service for low-income customers that critics say will hit Indian Country hard if fully implemented. But FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai and other supporters say the reforms would close the digital divide between urban and rural Americans by ending “ongoing waste, fraud and abuse” in the program that serves more than 12 million people nationwide – and 212,630 people in Arizona as of August. The Lifeline program, established under the Reagan administration, offers a subsidy of $9.25 a month to low-income residents, with residents of tribal areas eligible to receive an additional $25 subsidy per month. A Government Accountability Office Report earlier this year found a number of problems with the current program, including the FCC’s inability to verify how many of the 12.3 million people getting Lifeline were using it as a secondary phone service. The GAO also said it was only able to confirm two-thirds of customers were getting government support, like Medicaid or food stamps, critical to participation in the program. The commission voted 3-2 last week for a series of immediate changes – including a shift in how tribal funds are allocated – and a call for comment on several proposed changes that include an...

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Good Book gets good look in town where The Word is usually political

Joel T. Vernile Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 Good Book gets good look in town where The Word is usually political WASHINGTON – The Washington monument that Mark Singer and Kim Bongiorno came to see wasn’t old and it wasn’t on the National Mall and it wasn’t dedicated – strictly – to U.S. history. But don’t tell the Scottsdale couple that it wasn’t worth the trip. “It’s phenomenal what they’ve done,” Bongiorno said after touring the new Museum of the Bible on its opening last weekend. “The Scriptures come to life, and it’s just unbelievable.” The new, privately funded nonprofit museum sits just off the National Mall and just four blocks from the U.S. Capitol in a 430,000-square-foot building that was a refrigerated warehouse before a two-year reconstruction. It is a “rare attraction,” one local tourism official said, in a town full of publicly supported, secular monuments and museums. But it is not about pushing any one religion, the museum’s founders are quick to note. “We created this museum to help our guests understand and appreciate the role of the Bible, not only in America, but globally,” said museum President Cary Summers at a dedication ceremony last Friday. “We have no other agenda.” Hobby Lobby President Steve Green cofounded, and was a major benefactor for, the $500 million facility that he said aims to explore the Bible not from a...

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