Category: Cronkite News

News21: America’s Weed Rush

Staff Sunday, Aug. 16, 2015 News21: America’s Weed Rush America’s Weed Rush , an investigation of marijuana legalization in America, is the 2015 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia, investigative reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates. Each year, students selected into the program report in depth on a topic of national importance. This year, 27 journalism students from 19 universities traveled to half of the country to examine issues surrounding marijuana legalization, medicinal marijuana and recreational marijuana. As a result, this project showcases the voices of longtime politicians, parents, patients, mothers and advocacy groups on all sides of the debate. The fellows conducted hundreds of interviews, reviewed thousands of pages of state statutes and other records and assembled several...

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Report: Arizona beer has an economic kick, too, in terms of jobs, taxes

Nihal Krishan Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015 Report: Arizona beer has an economic kick, too, in terms of jobs, taxes WASHINGTON – When Rob Fullmer, the executive director of the Arizona Craft Brewers Guild, says “everything is improved by the presence of a brewery,” he’s talking about the economic buzz it brings and not the alcoholic kind. “Anytime you can put a business between two breweries, you’ll see a much more foot traffic in that area, and you’ll see a real benefit to your employees,” said Fullmer – not to mention “the lunches and happy hours.” New industry-generated numbers appear to back up that claim that beer brings economic growth and prosperity. A recent report by the National Beer Wholesalers Association said the beer industry in Arizona – from brewers to drivers to bartenders – had an economic output of almost $4.3 billion in 2014, generated more than $800 million in federal and state taxes and was responsible for 38,627 jobs in the state. “Arizona’s beer industry is doing slightly better than most,” said the association’s chief economist, Lester Jones. “It’s marginally above the national average in terms of its economic output, wages, jobs – which is not a bad place to be at all.” With a gross state product in Arizona of just over $279 billion in 2013, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the beer industry...

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Small UA program produces big results in horse racing industry

Chris Wimmer Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015 Small UA program produces big results in horse racing industry TUCSON — The well-dressed horse trainer with the signature white hair and dark sunglasses who was the darling of the sports media this spring got his start in the racing industry in the most unlikely of places. Before Bob Baffert trained the first Triple Crown winner in 47 years, he cultivated his tradecraft in Tucson. Baffert, a native of Nogales, who guided American Pharoah into the history books, is the most recognizable alumnus of the Race Track Industry Program at the University of Arizona. But he is just one of the nearly 700 graduates of a program that is one of a kind. The program is small — usually less than 30 total students combined between undergraduate and graduate levels — but its alumni permeate every layer of the racing industry, from Del Mar, California, to Lexington, Kentucky, to Saratoga Springs, New York. They are CEOs, presidents, directors, and racetrack managers. They are farm managers and stewards and breeders. They are thoroughbred trainers like Baffert and Todd Pletcher. Pletcher has amassed a staggering list of victories and awards. As a trainer, he currently ranks No. 1 in earnings for 2015 and for all-time, according to Equibase Co. The program, which offers both bachelor’s and master’s degrees, is firmly established and well respected inside...

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Cards’ coaching intern Welter can learn from female community college coach

Michael Nowels Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015 Cards’ coaching intern Welter can learn from female community college coach More than 30 years ago, Dot Murphy, former All-American and women’s basketball coach at Mississippi University for Women, sat with her children at Hinds Community College football practice watching her husband, Gene, coach the Eagles defense. Hinds head coach Bill Buckner suggested she join him on the field and put her coaching and athletic prowess to use with the wide receivers. The first few times he brought it up, she laughed off the idea. At some point, though, the Murphys realized Buckner was serious, and Dot chose to sign on and join the men on the field at the Raymond, Mississippi, school for the 1984 season. She stayed there as wide receivers coach for 21 years. “My father was a football coach. I never thought about coaching football. I thought basketball would be what I would stick with for the most part,” Murphy said. “So it’s been an interesting life because I’ve coached football for a long time.” At the time, Buckner and Murphy agreed to keep the story quiet because neither really knew how the arrangement would work out. “Eventually we did release it to the media and it went coast-to-coast,” Murphy said. “There were newspaper clippings and interviews over the phone from a lot of places.” While those cut-out articles...

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Transgender soldiers watch closely as Pentagon reviews ban on service

Jamie Cochran Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015 Transgender soldiers watch closely as Pentagon reviews ban on service WASHINGTON – When Capt. Jennifer Peace looks in the mirror, she sees a woman who serves her country like more than 200,000 other women in the military. She wears a uniform, goes to work and serves like all the others. But when the Army looks at Capt. Peace, it sees a man. Peace, an intelligence officer who has served a little more than 10 years in the Army, is a transgender soldier who came out in January to her unit at Fort Lewis, Washington. While her fellow soldiers have been supportive, Peace said, they still have to live by Army rules and are concerned about stepping over the line. She said soldiers working for her were told, “We use male pronouns. No one will use female pronouns with Capt. Peace.” “It’s those things that wear on you,” said Peace, who was posted for several years at Fort Huachuca and considers that base her military home. Advocacy groups claim there may be as many as 15,000 transgender members of the military currently serving, who don’t feel comfortable opening up to their units as Peace did. That’s because, until only recently, they could be drummed out of the service if they came forward. That began to change last month when Defense Secretary Ash Carter declared...

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