Category: Cronkite News

Oregon fans find safe haven in Scottsdale

Antonio Cannavaro Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Oregon fans find safe haven in Scottsdale With green-and-white banners, a photo-laden shrine to the 2011 BCS Championship and a table with a big yellow “O,” there is no question that the Well Bar in Scottsdale is a University of Oregon bar. Since 2006, the bar on Scottsdale Road has been a little piece of Oregon in Arizona. “We are the Autzen in the desert,” said John Marston, owner of the Well Bar, comparing his establishment to Oregon’s home field in Eugene, Oregon, Autzen Stadium. Marston was born in Eugene, went to high school in Eugene and attended the University of Oregon. Despite these strong connections to Eugene, he moved to Scottsdale, to get away from the gloomy Oregon weather. “I came out here trying to get out of the rain,” Marston said. “(I) bought a bar right next to Sun Devil country and it is so much fun; Made an Oregon bar, which is great because there are so much Oregon people that come to the desert.” Brian Crisp, a relocated Oregonian who has been living in the desert since 1993, watches as many Oregon games as he can at the Well Bar. “I love it here,” Crisp said. “It is like a mini-Autzen Stadium in the desert. Great place for Duck fans to come together, watch games, meet new friends.” On...

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Scientists discover extra genes in elephants that help fight cancer

Lauren Michaels Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Scientists discover extra genes in elephants that help fight cancer Scientists have been stumped for decades as to why elephants rarely get cancer. A new discovery, with a link to ASU, may have the answer. Elephants have a 5 percent mortality rate linked to cancer. That’s half the rate for humans, even though elephants have far more cells than humans. Scientists have been studying elephants to look for clues to their cancer-fighting power. Carlo Maley, an associate professor at ASU Biodesign Institute, worked with a team on the ground-breaking discovery. “What we found was that they have many extra copies of a tumor suppressor gene,” Maley said. “So, there’s a gene and one of its functions is to prevent cancer.” Read more: WHO report: Bacon and other processed meats cause cancer It’s called gene P53. Humans have two copies, while elephants have at least 40. Once the gene detects a risk of cancer in a cell, it kills off the cell right away before any tumor has a chance to grow. “So this is really exciting to us, it means every large organism out there has a key to preventing cancer and there’s just discoveries waiting to be made,” said Maley. At the Phoenix Zoo, Sheena is a 43-year-old Asian elephant – the type that scientists have been studying. Heather Wright, the elephant...

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Maricopa county attorney: Sheriff’s office to watch marijuana conference closely

Staff Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Maricopa county attorney: Sheriff’s office to watch marijuana conference closely County Attorney Bill Montgomery said it’s a federal crime to smoke weed without a medical marijuana license. Officers will be at the conference watching for people who are smoking it..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Local shelter strives to increase pit bull adoptions

Alisha Liyanage Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Local shelter strives to increase pit bull adoptions Pit bulls are not always the most popular pet, but animal shelters are lending a helping paw to find these dogs a home. According to a study in the United States by dogsbite.org , a non-profit website that advocates for victims of dog maulings, pit bulls accounted for 62 percent of 326 fatal dog attacks in the 10 years from 2005-2014. The website said pit bulls account for just 6 percent of the pet dog population. Though no Arizona cities have banned pit bulls as some cities in other states have, it’s often difficult to rent an apartment or live in a condo with a pit bull as a pet. Nicole Denton, Phoenix pit bull owner, rescued her two pit bulls, Link and Shelby, from a shelter in Tennessee. Although she wouldn’t have chosen any other breed, she says they are often misunderstood and mistreated, which can lead to them having an aggressive nature. “A lot of people are chaining them to their yards and not really treating them as the family pet they should be,” said Denton. Some pit bulls and pit bull mixes are not as lucky as Link and Shelby and end up in animal shelters for long periods of time. Melissa Gable, Maricopa County Animal Care and Control spokeswoman, said, “we...

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Cronkite News: Oct. 28, 2015

Staff Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 Cronkite News: Oct. 28, 2015 This edition of Cronkite News focuses on the GOP debate and some recent breakthroughs in cancer research..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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