Category: Cronkite News

At Mesa town hall, McCain repeats warnings about the need to act on ISIS

MESA – CHASE GOLIGHTLY/CRONKITE NEWS: Arizona’s senior Sen. John McCain was back in the Valley today, with big concerns on the future of our state’s military families and the growing threat of ISIS overseas. McCain’s warnings come as the fight has intensified over the Syrian border, and Secretary of State John Kerry made an urgent plea to Turkish leaders to join an international coalition against ISIS. President Obama was briefed this afternoon, and there are continuing debates about the role of the U.S. in Syrian air strikes, and what could possibly come next. REAR ADM. JOHN KIRBY/PENTAGON PRESS SECRETARY: The commander-in-chief has been pretty clear, there’s not going to be a return of ground troops, U.S. ground troops, in a combat role in this fight. What we do believe, and what we have said, is that you do need competent ground forces. Those ground forces are best when they’re indigenous ground forces. CHASE GOLIGHTLY/CRONKITE NEWS: McCain voiced his concerns during a town hall meeting at an ammunitions manufacturing plant in Mesa today. Cronkite News reporter Kayla Wall was there. KAYLA WALL/CRONKITE NEWS: Employees at the Nammo Talley ammunitions plant in Mesa welcomed Sen. John McCain around noon, and were met by his strong military message on ISIS. SEN. JOHN MCCAIN/ARIZONA: What could be, over time, and likely to be a direct threat to the United States of America. KAYLA...

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Phoenix residents upset over new FAA-implemented flight paths

WASHINGTON, D.C. – CHASE GOLIGHTLY/CRONKITE NEWS: A recent change to outbound flights from Sky Harbor International Airport is making waves in Valley neighborhoods and sending complaints all the way to the nation’s capital. The new flight path for some Sky Harbor takeoffs, takes planes over the Grand Avenue corridor and over several historic neighborhoods in central Phoenix. And over the past three weeks, hundreds of residents in areas like F.Q. Story and Garfield have been voicing their complaints, and questioning why the change had to happen at all. Those complaints have been heard all the way in Washington where our reporter Justin McDuffie has more on the story. Justin? JUSTIN MCDUFFIE/CRONKITE NEWS: In the month since the routes were changed, Sky Harbor has received nearly 350 noise complaints in comparison to last year, when they received only 221 complaints for the entire year. On Sept. 18, the Federal Aviation Administration implemented 14 new departure and arrival paths at Sky Harbor International Airport. But according to congressman Ed Pastor, who represents the affected Grand Avenue area… REP. ED PASTOR/(D) DISTRICT 7: Most of them seem to be working, except one, it’s the one that’s going into the historic districts, so we’re asking them to re-evaluate that route. JUSTIN MCDUFFIE/CRONKITE NEWS: After several attempts to get in contact with the FAA, Ian Gregor told us in this email that the changes...

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ASU selects developer for district that will fund improvements to athletic facilities

TEMPE – Arizona State University has selected a developer for a 330 acres of residences, offices, restaurants and more designed to generate money to renovate Sun Devil Stadium and other athletic facilities. ASU President Michael M. Crow said Catellus Development Corp., based in Austin, Texas, will achieve the school’s goals of developing world-class athletic facilities, adding to downtown Tempe’s economy and fostering sustainability. “Catellus has been defined a developer capable of operating on all three of those parameters at the same time,” he said at a news conference. The university has launched a $260 million renovation of Sun Devil Stadium, committing $210 to the project and launching a campaign to raise the remaining $50 million. The site, which includes the stadium, Wells Fargo Arena and ASU Karsten Golf Course on the north side of the Tempe campus, has been designated an athletic facilities district that will generate lease revenue for the university. ASU expects development on the site to take between 10 and 20 years. ASU won’t have to pay property taxes for the land, and Tempe and the state of Arizona will receive sales taxes from developments in the district. Ted Antenucci, CEO of Catellus Development, said his company excels at public partnerships, pointing to the redevelopment of Austin’s airport as an example. “ASU joins other organizations such as the cities of Austin, Alameda, and San Francisco, where...

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Suns’ Len looks forward to expanded role but must overcome broken finger

Most top-five NBA draft picks are immediately featured in the plans of the teams that choose them, but an ankle surgery and the Phoenix Suns’ unexpected success last season had Alex Len waiting to contribute. Now that he has healthy legs under him, Len said he is ready to make an impact. “My ankles are healthy. Everything’s good. One of my goals in the offseason was to condition myself, and I came to camp in much better shape this season,” he said during last week’s training camp in Flagstaff. But health became an issue again Tuesday, when Len fractured a pinky in practice. It’s the same finger he fractured in July’s NBA Summer League. The Suns will reevaluate his status next week but for now say he is sidelined indefinitely. Len, who averaged 2.0 points per game in 42 contests during his rookie season, said pre-draft ankle surgery hampered his conditioning throughout the year, limiting his playing time and role on the team. This preseason his improved conditioning and durability have coaches and teammates looking forward to an expanded role for the 7-foot-1 center from Ukraine. “For a big guy who’s long, he’s able to get up the court,” head coach Jeff Hornacek said during training camp in Flagstaff. “At this altitude, it usually hits the bigger guys more than the guards, but Alex has been able to get...

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Suns look to Tolliver to replace Frye’s production at forward

PHOENIX – When Channing Frye left the Phoenix Suns for the Orlando Magic in the offseason, much more than his 11.1 points per game went with him. Frye’s ability to shoot 3-pointers and spread the floor was a key asset to the Suns offense, something point guards Goran Dragic and Eric Bledsoe didn’t take for granted when they were carving defenses and driving to the basket. But the team is confident it’s found someone who can keep defenders honest without missing a beat. Enter Anthony Tolliver, a 6-foot-8 stretch forward signed in free agency. “I’m moving around at all times, picking and popping and making the bigger guys move,” Tolliver said. “Bigger guys hate guarding me because I don’t stop moving.” Head coach Jeff Hornacek said Tolliver’s versatility was a big reason why the Suns the signed him to a two-year, $6 million contract in the offseason. After almost exclusively playing small forward for the Charlotte Bobcats last season, more of Tolliver’s minutes will be coming at power forward for the Suns. “He can mix it up,” Horancek said. “He can shoot it or take the ball and put it down a couple times and make another play. It’s not just all spot-up shooting, so he’s a good weapon.” Hornacek said that while Tolliver won’t be expected to play center like Frye did, Tolliver, who shot a career-best 41.3...

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