Category: Cronkite News

At Indigenous Peoples March, different reservations, same stories

Keerthi Vedantam Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 At Indigenous Peoples March, different reservations, same stories WASHINGTON – Nataanii Means spent part of his childhood on the Navajo Nation with little electricity or running water, while energy companies mined coal and uranium nearby. He said those operations left the water polluted and undrinkable. Means brought that experience to the Indigenous Peoples March in Washington Friday where he heard the same story with different roots: People from South Dakota, Minnesota and Washington talked of pollution caused by mining or leaking oil pipelines on their reservations. “It’s our duty as indigenous people to … be conscious of what’s happening in the world,” said Means, who now lives in northern Minnesota where he fights against a proposed pipeline. “To be a protector.” The first-ever Indigenous Peoples March brought thousands from all over the country and from as far away as Australia and the Caribbean to raise awareness of a number of issues: violence against indigenous people on and off reservations, environmental regulation, safety for women and the border wall. “It was just time,” said Kelly Holmes, a march organizer from Denver. “We were all rallying locally about the same issues so we decided to come together.” The march was at once a solemn affair recognizing ongoing hardships of Native Americans as well as a celebration of defiance and activism. It began in front of...

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Time is right: Pacers among behind-the-scenes stars of Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Marathon

Joshua Shure Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 Time is right: Pacers among behind-the-scenes stars of Rock ‘n’ Roll Arizona Marathon PHOENIX – Thousands of runners from around the country will make their way to the starting line of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon in downtown Phoenix early Sunday morning to run the full 26.2 miles.  Among the swarm of people stretching and preparing for the hours of running ahead, a few dark blue signs at the end of a stick will be raised into the sky. Printed with varying times on them, a select few experienced volunteer runners will be hoisting these signs above the crowd. The Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon utilizes the help of Sole Sports Running, a local specialty running store, to assemble a team of pacesetters whose jobs are to assist participants in reaching their goals. Anywhere from 35 to 50 percent of the runners doing the full marathon are first time runners, said race organizer Judy Stowers. As a marathon runner who has taken advantage of pace teams in the past, Stowers understands the pacers’ value. “Everyone comes into the event with a goal,” Stowers said. “Seeing someone holding that goal along the route gives them an opportunity to stay on pace with their goal and to get to the finish line at the time they want.” .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow:...

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Rainy day fund, drought and teacher pay: Ducey proposes 2020 budget

Hailey Mensik Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 Rainy day fund, drought and teacher pay: Ducey proposes 2020 budget PHOENIX – Gov. Doug Ducey on Friday proposed a fiscal year 2020 budget that would double the rainy day fund to $1 billion, put aside $165 million to hike teacher salaries and battle drought. Here are three key areas of the proposed budget , which still needs legislative approval: 1. Ducey wants to save for a rainy day. Ducey aides said a $1 billion contingency fund – twice as much as the $450 million set aside for the previous fiscal year – could mean the state avoids the fate of the 2008 recession. “The governor has no interest in repeating the mistakes of the past,” said Glen Farley, Ducey’s chief economist. “When the revenues evaporated during the Great Recession , there was no flexibility for the general fund to rapidly respond, and it created a sort of catastrophic fiscal condition for the state,” he said. 2. Ducey said teachers will get the salary hike he promised in 2018. The tailwinds of the statewide teacher walkouts last spring, the force that became Red for Ed, are still at work. The governor proposed $637 million for K-12 education, including $165 million to raise teacher pay by 20 percent by 2020. He would set aside $68 million for additional assistance, such as textbooks, curriculum and...

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‘Maverick Mural’ in Scottsdale provokes squabble over property rights

Phil Latzman Friday, Jan. 18, 2019 ‘Maverick Mural’ in Scottsdale provokes squabble over property rights SCOTTSDALE – A battle over the proper way to pay an artistic tribute to an Arizona icon is brewing in Old Town Scottsdale. Last week, a privately-funded public mural honoring John McCain was put on hold by city leaders. The project is being reconsidered after complaints from a local business owner who insists his opposition has more to do with property rights and respect for the late senator than it does politics. The so-called “Maverick Mural” is the brainchild of local two architects. “The idea was borne with this very large blank facade, to be able to do something for the community,” said Tommy Suchart, principal architect of Chen + Suchart Studios at Marshall Way and Third Avenue. The blank facade is a 120-foot-wide by 30-foot-high wall on the side of Suchart’s building, which is owned by an out-of-town landlord. The mural idea, which came from Suchart’s colleague Aaron Bass, was approved by the building’s owner. It involves 30,000 colorful cut-out pictographs of Arizona’s five Cs — cattle, citrus, climate copper and cotton — that morph into a red, white and blue image of the late senator. “As they aggregate, they create the face, and it’s all based on paint densities and a simple math equation that really becomes this image and this icon...

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