Category: Cronkite News

In Focus, episode 2: What defunding Planned Parenthood could mean for Arizonans

Freesia DeNaples Friday, March 24, 2017 In Focus, episode 2: What defunding Planned Parenthood could mean for Arizonans A Republican health reform bill stalled in the House of Representatives this week, but the proposal gave an inside view into potential plans to prohibit federal health insurance from covering care at Planned Parenthood. Hear more: Find all In Focus episodes here In Arizona, approximately 33,000 people received care at Planned Parenthood clinics in 2015, much of which did not involve abortion. If government health plans no longer covered care there, thousands of people might have to look elsewhere. Could other clinics serve them instead? Cronkite News producer Freesia DeNaples in Phoenix and reporter Kendra Penningroth in Washington take an in-depth look at the issue. (Audio coming soon) The In Focus theme song is called “Wounds (Remix)” by Ketsa , used under Creative Commons . Share your feedback about the episode here...

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UA partners with company to make concrete out of byproduct from coal mining

Lahela Maxwell Friday, March 24, 2017 UA partners with company to make concrete out of byproduct from coal mining TUSCON – The University of Arizona has partnered with a private manufacturing firm to create a more eco-friendly version of concrete. Abraham Jalbout, CEO of Metoxs and Acrete, first approached Tech Launch at the University of Arizona with an idea to use leftovers from mining and coal plants for practical construction purposes. “Abe came to us with all these great ideas, and Tech Launch decided to invest in them,” said Bob Sleeper, the licensing director for Tech Launch, which provides funding for inventions and startups. The pair connected with professor Jinhong Zhang, who has researched construction materials created from waste for five years under a grant from the National Science Foundation. Junhong Zhang, a professor at the University of Arizona, has spent three years working with fly ash, a waste product from coal-burning power plants. (Photo by Courtney Kock/Cronkite News) Zhang spent three years working with fly ash, a waste product from coal-burning power plants. Fly ash is a fine, powdery material that used to be released into the air until the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began requiring air filtering devices in coal plants in 2011. Physicians’ groups said the ash’s extremely fine texture can make it easier to inhale and lodge into the lungs, leaching heavy metals and other...

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Advocates: Cutting energy funds leaves poor with ‘heat or eat’ choice

Joseph Guzman Friday, March 24, 2017 Advocates: Cutting energy funds leaves poor with ‘heat or eat’ choice WASHINGTON – Arizona got more than $21 million to help low-income residents pay their heating bills last year and another $1 million for home weatherization – money that would be lost under the Trump administration’s proposed budget. President Donald Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget would eliminate the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program and the Weatherization Assistance Program, programs that the administration said do not perform as well as they should and which are better handled at the state level. The programs are relatively small in terms of federal spending – LIHEAP nationally cost $3.36 billion in fiscal 2016 – but advocates say they make a big difference for low-income families who receive the funding, allowing them to stretch their household budgets so they don’t have to make a “heat or eat” decision. “When you are living in a home that’s not well insulated, your energy bill can be very expensive, and what LIHEAP does is allow for assistance so people can afford to feed their families,” said Mark Hall, executive director of Red Feather development group, which works with partners in the Hopi and Navajo reservations on sustainable housing. “If that (funding) gets cut and their bill goes from $30 to $300 a month, that is significant,” Hall said. But small-government groups welcomed...

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Arizona students combine forces to gain speed on SpaceX’s Hyperloop competition

Farai Benett Friday, March 24, 2017 Arizona students combine forces to gain speed on SpaceX’s Hyperloop competition MESA – How can you get from Phoenix to San Diego in less than 45 minutes safely? By jumping into a pod that levitates and travels through a tube at 750 miles per hour, of course. It’s called a Hyperloop system, and more than 100 Arizona students have worked for months to bring the concept closer to reality. SpaceX , the aerospace company led by Elon Musk, developed the high-speed Hyperloop technology and launched a competition to see who could accelerate its development, according to the company’s website. Arizona State University students participated in the first competition – aimed at building a high-speed pod – but the team didn’t make the final cut. Undeterred, the students combined efforts with other Arizona schools, including Thunderbird School of Global Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Northern Arizona University, according to AZLoop ’s website. Students from several major Arizona schools have joined forces to form AZLoop and will participate in SpaceX’s Hyperloop competition. (Photo courtesy of AZLoop) The volunteers often spend Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights – and sometimes until the morning – inventing strategies to improve their pod at a 3,000-square foot lab space on ASU’s Polytechnic campus. They plan to compete in the next competition this summer. This one’s focused on one thing: maximum...

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Social Refresh: March 24, 2017

Caity Hemmerle Friday, March 24, 2017 Social Refresh: March 24, 2017 Social Refresh: Cronkite News top stories of the week Another week at Cronkite News means more reporting on Arizona’s politics, education news, border issues and more. Here is a recap of the top stories from this week’s broadcasts. Reporter Veronica Costa gave viewers a look at a Gilbert goat yoga class, while Mija Maslar reported on a concussion study conducted with ASU football. Morgan Wheeler took a tour of the HGTV smart home in Scottsdale, and Amanda Luberto covered the announcement of Lost Lake festival in Phoenix. Finally, Ivory Riner reported on the honoring of Tuskegee Airmen , the first African-American military servicemen who served with the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War...

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