Category: Cronkite News

May 26, 2017 Newscast

Staff Friday, May 26, 2017 May 26, 2017 Newscast Cronkite News future special: smart homes, stem cells and teaching tech Our Cronkite News future beat focuses on technologies, science and innovations shaping the next generation of...

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Arizona cyber experts warn that WannaCry outbreak just tip of iceberg

Nathan J. Fish Friday, May 26, 2017 Arizona cyber experts warn that WannaCry outbreak just tip of iceberg WASHINGTON – Arizona cybersecurity experts called the recent international cyberattacks known as “WannaCry” among the worst attacks they have seen, and they called it a warning about the country’s lack of cybersecurity preparation. “This is only the beginning of a very, very long list of bad stuff,” said Brett Scott, co-founder of the Arizona Cyber Warfare Range. “It’s about as bad as one can imagine. I suppose one day it will get worse because every time I think we’ve hit the limit, it always gets worse.” Frank Grimmelmann, president and CEO of Arizona Cyber Threat Response Alliance said, thinks WannaCry “is simply the tip of the iceberg.” “I simply view this as another chapter, not necessarily the beginning of the end,” Grimmelmann said. “If vulnerabilities are there and you know, it’s not a question of if you will be attacked or will they ultimately be successful, it’s a question of when.” The WannaCry malware that swept around the world last week infected vulnerable computers and held the data on them hostage by encrypting files and demanding a ransom to get the hackers to unlock the files – hence the classification, ransomware. The attack made its way through multiple countries including Russia, parts of Europe and the U.S. Published reports said the...

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Muslims seek religiously inclusive food, beauty services in Phoenix area

Saundra Wilson Friday, May 26, 2017 Muslims seek religiously inclusive food, beauty services in Phoenix area PHOENIX – Some Muslims who want to live out their faith in Arizona can have a difficult time finding certain businesses that cater to their needs. Some Muslims choose to live according to two Islamic traditions: wearing a hijab, or head covering for women, and eating halal, referring to meat that is prepared according to Islamic law. The practices can make eating out, grocery shopping, and getting beauty services more difficult for some Muslims. “It is hard to find halal food, period,” said Aminah Shakoor, a 21-year-old Chandler resident who adheres to halal guidelines. For Shakoor, eating out with friends means always having to order a vegetarian or fish entree because the meat is not halal. For other Muslim women who wear hijabs, finding beauty salons that are familiar with Muslim culture and can provide extra privacy for them isn’t made simple by a Google search. Most salons don’t market or advertise their privacy options for Muslim women wearing hijabs on their websites. Wasiba Rahman and Lena Sarsour, who wear hijabs, grew up getting their hair done by family members or other Muslim women in their community. Within the comfort of their own homes and communities, they could have hair care experiences free from the pressure and potential awkwardness of explaining their requests...

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Military veterans benefit from positive impact of jiu-jitsu

Christopher Whitcomb Friday, May 26, 2017 Military veterans benefit from positive impact of jiu-jitsu PHOENIX — Carlos Rojas served in the Navy — he enlisted before the terrorist attacks on 9/11 — and is now based in the Valley as an instructor of jiu-jitsu. He has seen how the sport can impact one’s life. “There’s a saying we have in Brazilian jiu-jitsu that a lot of guys that have been training for a while are familiar with, and that’s ‘jiu-jitsu saved my life,’” Rojas said. “Right after we got back from our first sets of deployments into Iraq and Afghanistan, jiu-jitsu really became a therapeutic agent for me,” Rojas said. “It became a place I could release, a place that when I had extreme levels of stress going on, whether it be from military training or married life or everything, it was a place I could let out my energy. It just became essentially . . . my therapy.” Jiu-jitsu is a sport and martial art that was created from Kodokan judo. It is a combat sport that takes place primarily on the ground. Training partners fight for positions and look for submission attempts on their opponents. There is no striking of the opponent. Instead, expert positioning and movement is key. The competition continues until one combatant gets caught in a submission and is forced to tap. Tapping is...

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Local restaurants embrace Arizona Restaurant Week to attract new customers

Alexis Kuhbander Friday, May 26, 2017 Local restaurants embrace Arizona Restaurant Week to attract new customers PHOENIX – Customers can chow down on meals at a discount during Arizona Restaurant Week , getting a chance to sample new cuisine, travel outside their neighborhood and try seasonal food at a bargain. The event offers residents and tourists three-course meals for $33 or $44 per person from more than 140 restaurants in the Phoenix area and elsewhere in central and southern Arizona . The ten-day event started May 19 and ends Sunday. Restaurant owners said the event is good for business. It lasted about a week when the Arizona Restaurant Association launched it in 2008 but has stretched out since that time. The meals span diverse cuisines, from Southwestern to Ethiopian. “We have seen the restaurants increase their sales at Roaring Fork and Salty Sow , a sister restaurant, year after year with restaurant week,” said Jim VanDercook, president of Guy and Larry Restaurants. Roaring Fork was one of the first restaurants to participate in the event, starting in 2008. Arabeen Arora, owner of The Dhaba in Tempe, said customers who live as far as 30 miles away come to sample the restaurant’s Punjabi Indian cuisine. One goal of restaurant week is to draw people outside their neighborhood into other parts of the Valley or Arizona. The Dhaba offers a special...

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