Category: Cronkite News

UA introduces first African-American head football coach

ANDREW MILLAN Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018 UA introduces first African-American head football coach TUCSON — On the heels of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the University of Arizona introduced the football program’s first African-American head coach. History was made in college football for the second time in the state with the hiring of Kevin Sumlin. UA’s rival, Arizona State, brought aboard its first African-American head football coach, Herm Edwards, in December. “Some say it’s a historical day, and you know what, it is,” Arizona athletic director Dave Heeke said. “We broke a barrier. We should be really proud of that. Clearly we found the right guy to lead this program, to be the next guy to take Arizona football forward.” Sumlin recognizes the importance of being the first black head coach of the football program but hopes his hiring paves the way for a future where the hiring of an African-American head coach is no longer the main topic of conversation. Worthy of note: this is the most of any FBS conference, and one of only four conferences with multiple African-American head football coaches. Pac-12: 3ACC/Big Ten/American Athletic: 2Mid-American/SEC/Sun Belt/USA: 1 https://t.co/rD1Fyo2D9u — Cronkite News: Phoenix Sports (@sportscronkite) January 16, 2018 “It is significant but this is my third time being the head coach, and I’ve been asked that question every time,” Sumlin said. “It is significant and it...

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Trump tweets “DACA is probably dead” after renewal of DACA applications resumes

Mersedes Cervantes and Olivia Richard Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018 Trump tweets “DACA is probably dead” after renewal of DACA applications resumes The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced Saturday night they would continue accepting requests to renew DACA. The decision came after a California federal judge issued an injunction ordering the Trump administration to continue receiving applications to renew the program, which grants legal status to immigrants who came to the United States as children. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is an immigration policy that was implemented in 2012 by former president Barack Obama. Under this policy, more than 800,000 people benefit from DACA, including over 25,000 DACA beneficiaries in Arizona as of September 27, 2017. Shortly after the USCIS released a statement saying, “Until further notice, and unless otherwise provided in this guidance, the DACA policy will be operated on the terms in place before it was rescinded on Sept. 5, 2017.” — Trump tweeted that the program was “probably dead”. DACA is probably dead because the Democrats don’t really want it, they just want to talk and take desperately needed money away from our Military. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 14, 2018 President Donald Trump criticized the decision to continue accepting DACA renewals via Twitter stating that, “DACA is probably dead because the Democrats don’t really want it, they just want to...

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Facing fears: iPhone X’s new facial recognition raises concerns

Allison Bailey Monday, Jan. 15, 2018 Facing fears: iPhone X’s new facial recognition raises concerns PHOENIX – Even before the news reports about problems with Apple’s iPhone X – one reviewer for Forbes called it the worst iPhone ever – some experts had reservations about the facial recognition technology that is one of the phone’s marquee features. Arizona State University professor Sonia Bovio recently bought an iPhone 8, mainly for financial reasons – the iPhone X sells for nearly $1,000 – but also because it lacks the facial recognition feature of the newer model. “What are we willing to give up for convenience in terms of privacy and security?” Bovio asked. “We want things to be convenient and easy, but that comes at a cost. And that is usually the cost of our identity, and potentially, our financial risks.” That’s just one of the issues that have greeted the iPhone X since its November release. Sales have been below expectations. According to published reports, design changes have left some longtime users cold, and the facial recognition software has been criticized as slow or, in some reports, unable to distinguish among Asian users. But Apple continues to tout the phone’s features, including a super retina screen, a wireless charger and the most talked-about feature: a censored camera for facial recognition. Users can unlock the phone with a glance. With facial...

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Court reverses death sentence in brutal Mohave County triple murder

Philip Athey Friday, Jan. 12, 2018 Court reverses death sentence in brutal Mohave County triple murder WASHINGTON – A federal appeals court Friday overturned the death sentence in a brutal 1996 triple murder near Kingman, saying Arizona courts did not give enough weight to the killer’s troubled childhood and mental health issues. The ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the Arizona Supreme Court improperly dismissed mitigating circumstances in Robert Poyson’s case because there was no direct link – or “causal nexus” – between those circumstances and the crime. The appeals court said that violated Poyson’s Eighth Amendment protection against cruel and unusual punishment. It came in “the midst of the 15-year period during which that court consistently applied an unconstitutional causal nexus test” to evidence in capital sentencings, the federal court said. Attorneys for the state and for Poyson did not return requests for comment Friday. Poyson was 19 and homeless in April 1996 when he met Leta Kagen, who invited him to stay in her Golden Valley trailer with her son Robert Delahunt, 15, and Roland Wear. In August, Kagen met Frank Anderson, 48, and his girlfriend Kimberly Lane, 14, and also gave them a place to stay, according to court records. Once there, Anderson told Poyson he had organized crime connections in Chicago, leading those two and Lane to...

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Ducey unveils optimistic fiscal 2019 budget with emphasis on school spending

Lerman Montoya Friday, Jan. 12, 2018 Ducey unveils optimistic fiscal 2019 budget with emphasis on school spending PHOENIX – Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey’s office released his proposed fiscal 2019 budget on Friday with hopes the state will return to pre-recession spending. His focus: K-12 education. State officials highlighted that the record $10.1 billion budget would allocate 80 percent of new spending to K-12 education. “My budget will include a full commitment to accelerate the state’s K-12 investment and restore long-standing cuts from the recession,” Ducey said at his State of the State Address earlier this month. In fiscal 2016, the state’s school districts spent about $3,300 less per pupil than the 2014 national average, the most recent national data available, according to a report by the Arizona Auditor General . Matthew Gress, the director of the Governor’s Office of Strategic Planning and Budgeting, unveiled the budget, which includes $300 million more in spending over the current budget. He specified that the proposed budget would allocate $100 million for K-12 education. “K-12 education is the most important part of Doug Ducey’s responsibility as governor and is his No. 1 priority,” Gress said. Stephanie Parra, a spokeswoman for the Arizona Education Association , said the governor’s proposal is a step in the right direction, but the state needs to do more. “We appreciate the additional assistance that the $100 million for...

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