Category: Cronkite News

Arizona’s two abandoned-mine inspectors face daunting task: ‘We’re all by ourselves’

Chris McCrory Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018 Arizona’s two abandoned-mine inspectors face daunting task: ‘We’re all by ourselves’ WICKENBURG – Jerry Tyra started working underground in 1960, drilling ore samples to help mine companies figure out whether to develop a mine site. Since 2007, the 75-year-old has been doing a different kind of exploration: scouring the state for the thousands of abandoned mines some of his former employers may have left scattered throughout the Arizona desert. When he finds one, Tyra uses wire and metal posts to fence it off, placing warning signs on the wire. “I get my map programs out, and I just pick a township,” he said, standing near the edge of a 900-foot-deep mine shaft east of Wickenburg. “I take every little trail they’ve got. If I don’t find anything, I’ll go to the next one.” [related-story-right box-title=”In a hole, part one:” link=”https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2018/12/10/arizonas-abandoned-mine-problem/” image=”https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Mine-Signage-Danger-1200.jpg” headline=”Arizona officials lack funds to find, secure at least 100,000 abandoned mines”] Tyra is one of only two abandoned-mine supervisors in Arizona. The pair face an uphill battle trying to identify the estimated 100,000 abandoned mines in the state and render them safe, or at least safer. The Arizona State Mine Inspector’s Office has repeatedly asked for funds to hire more inspectors and permanently close more mines, but the state’s abandoned-mine program hasn’t seen a significant budget increase in more than a...

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Arizona’s two abandoned-mine inspectors face daunting task: ‘We’re all by ourselves’

Chris McCrory Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018 Arizona’s two abandoned-mine inspectors face daunting task: ‘We’re all by ourselves’ WICKENBURG – Jerry Tyra started working underground in 1960, drilling ore samples to help mine companies figure out whether to develop a mine site. Since 2007, the 75-year-old has been doing a different kind of exploration: scouring the state for the thousands of abandoned mines some of his former employers may have left scattered throughout the Arizona desert. When he finds one, Tyra uses wire and metal posts to fence it off, placing warning signs on the wire. “I get my map programs out, and I just pick a township,” he said, standing near the edge of a 900-foot-deep mine shaft east of Wickenburg. “I take every little trail they’ve got. If I don’t find anything, I’ll go to the next one.” [related-story-right box-title=”In a hole, part one:” link=”https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2018/12/10/arizonas-abandoned-mine-problem/” image=”https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Mine-Signage-Danger-1200.jpg” headline=”Arizona officials lack funds to find, secure at least 100,000 abandoned mines”] Tyra is one of only two abandoned-mine supervisors in Arizona. The pair face an uphill battle trying to identify the estimated 100,000 abandoned mines in the state and render them safe, or at least safer. The Arizona State Mine Inspector’s Office has repeatedly asked for funds to hire more inspectors and permanently close more mines, but the state’s abandoned-mine program hasn’t seen a significant budget increase in more than a...

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A bookie, a bet, a basketball player: 25 years ago, point-shaving scandal rocked Arizona State

Zachary Pekale Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018 A bookie, a bet, a basketball player: 25 years ago, point-shaving scandal rocked Arizona State PHOENIX – Through renovation and coaching changes, the ground floor of the Ed and Nadine Carson Student-Athlete Center at Arizona State has withstood the test of time. The museum is designed to chronicle proud moments in ASU athletics history, highlighting alumni such as Houston Rockets guard James Harden and former San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds. But hidden among the numerous plaques and glass cases stocked with memorabilia lies history buried in the shadows of infamy. Twenty-five years ago, the Arizona State men’s basketball program was at the center of a point-shaving scandal, one that has triggered new discussion in light of the Supreme Court’s decision in May to clear the way for states to legalize sports betting. “If gambling on colleges is (allowed) in 20 or 30 states, there is probably a 100 percent chance of a point-shaving scandal at some school,” Tom McMillan, CEO of LEAD1, an organization for athletic directors, said in April at a Sports Lawyers Association conference. Under coach Bill Frieder, the 1993-94 men’s basketball team was poised to compete for a spot in the NCAA Tournament, led by senior guard Stevin ‘Hedake’ Smith, a potential first-round draft pick. Smith entered the season as the leading returning scorer in the Pacific-10 Conference. As...

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Dec. 10, 2018 Newscast

Monday, Dec. 10, 2018 Dec. 10, 2018 Newscast The impact of water accumulation from Tropical Storm Rosa; declining water levels at Lake Mead and what it means for the west; and more

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