Category: Cronkite News

No longer on the fringe: Technology makes golf accessible to disabled community

Stephen Perez Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019 No longer on the fringe: Technology makes golf accessible to disabled community PHOENIX – It was 22 years ago when Navy veteran Diego Suazo was the victim of a shooting that changed his life. Suazo was at a New Year’s party with his family when he tried to break up an argument between his cousin and another person. “We were there for about five to 10 minutes, and I go outside and my cousin is arguing with some guy,” he said. A fight broke out, and when Suazo tried to break it up, the man fighting his cousin took a swing at Suazo. Another man shot Suazo, with the bullet striking him in the back. He collapsed to the ground and knew immediately that he was in trouble. The shooting left him paralyzed from the waist down. He found a difficult recovery aided by an unlikely source: adaptive golf. According to the American Physical Therapy Association, more than 56 million Americans are living with some sort of disability. Adaptive sports can help them remain active and healthy and provide a competitive outlet. And improved technology is providing more opportunities than ever. Suazo, for instance, uses a Paramobile chair in golf. The chair is designed to move over rough or uneven terrain, and the seat and chair back lift the user into a standing...

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Senate OKS open space bill, reviving Land and Water Conservation Fund

Andrew Howard Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 Senate OKS open space bill, reviving Land and Water Conservation Fund WASHINGTON – After months of gridlock, the Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill that permanently authorizes the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a program that has sent almost $240 million to Arizona for parks and open space projects. The fund was the biggest part of a sweeping 698-page public lands package that includes everything from local land transfers to wildfire initiatives to the designation of a National Nordic Museum. But lawmakers and advocates agreed that the most important part of the bill was the fund, which uses revenue from offshore oil and gas leases to fund federal, state and local open space and recreation projects. Since it was created in 1965, the fund has collected $40 billion and allocated close to half that, but the law authorizing the fund expired on Sept. 30. “It’s almost unconscionable that it was lapsed,” said Kevin Dahl, senior program manager for the Arizona office of the National Parks Conservation Association. “It’s great it’s happening now.” According to the Land and Water Conservation Fund Coalition, Arizona has received $239.5 million from the fund over the years. The money has gone to projects at Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Meade and Saguaro National Park, as well as to state parks like Lost Dutchman and Patagonia Lake. It has also...

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As border budget talks wind down, rhetoric from warring sides heats up

Keerthi Vedantam Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 As border budget talks wind down, rhetoric from warring sides heats up WASHINGTON – Jessica Rubio remembers it all “happened super fast.” Her brother was standing outside their Phoenix apartment at 5 p.m. when ICE agents arrested him. By 3 a.m. the next day, he had been deported back to Mexico, ending six years of living in the U.S. That was 2011, one year before the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program took effect, allowing Rubio to remain in the U.S. “The work permit I hold right now could have been the work permit that would have saved my brother,” Rubio, 26, said Wednesday in Washington where she joined dozens of activists who came to protest Immigration and Customs Enforcement. They say the agency is harmful to families separated in ICE raids and at detention centers. But as they were calling for ICE to be defunded, another group stood a short distance away on the Capitol grounds demanding more funding for the agency. They were Angel Families, people whose loved ones were killed by immigrants or overdosed on illicit drugs the survivors blame on border trafficking. They held signs as they called for stronger border security, including President Donald Trump’s border wall and increased ICE funding, among other demands. “What’s the downside in securing the border? What’s the downside on less illegal immigration?”...

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Arizona’s top 10 specialty license plates

Emily Garcia Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019 Arizona’s top 10 specialty license plates Arizona offers more than 60 specialty license plates, according to ADOT. The state sold 495,617 specialty license plates during fiscal year 2018. Every plate cost $25, and is an additional $25 to renew annually. For every specialty plate bought or renewed, $17 goes towards charity. To create a new plate , a state lawmaker must introduce a bill and have it approved by both houses of the state Legislature. Anyone is eligible to request specialty and custom plates through ServiceArizona . The top ten plates in terms of number sold or renewed: Veterans 92,115 purchased or renewed in 2018 Profits Arizona Veterans Donation Fund that benefits veterans in Arizona. Arizona Cardinals 74,092 purchased or renewed in 2018. Profits Cardinals Charities to help improve the lives of children, women and minorities. Military Support 38,842 purchased or renewed in 2018. Profits Arizona Veterans Donation Fund. Arizona Highways 32,148 purchased or renewed in 2018. Profits goes to Arizona Highways magazine. First Responder 29,963 purchased or renewed Profits 100 Club to continue supporting Arizona’s First Responders. University of Arizona 24,057 purchased or renewed in 2018. Profits university students with academic scholarships. Arizona State University 21,133 purchased or renewed Profits university students with financial aid through scholarships. Fallen officers 14,964 purchased or renewed. Supports the fund to help the families of fallen...

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