Category: Cronkite News

Friday forecast: Triple digits are back

Jodi Guerrerro Thursday, April 18, 2019 Friday forecast: Triple digits are back PHOENIX – Phoenix residents may see their first 100 degree day of the year on Friday. On average between 1981 and 2010, the first triple digit day has been May 2. The earliest recorded by the National Weather Service was March 26, 1988, and the latest October 27, 2016. Friday is also an Air Quality Index Action Day in Phoenix. This means the air quality range is unhealthy. The AQI is expected to be 101, which is unhealthy for sensitive groups. Thursday was moderate at 84 AQI. Weather conditions and ozone levels are to blame. This means you will want to stay inside and limit activity if you are an active adult or child; have a lung disease; or have asthma. Apache Junction, Maricopa, Pinal Air Park, Pinal County, San Tan Valley, Stanfield and Tucson all have an ozone high pollution advisory on Friday, too. To help with air quality during an action day you can set your air conditioner higher; choose to carpool or use public transportation; and limit the use of household and gardening chemicals. Temperatures in Phoenix will include a high near 98 and a low of 69. The sun will be out but there will be east winds around 5 mph in the morning and some calm wind later at night. It will...

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Census: Maricopa County – again – saw country’s biggest population gains

Andrew Howard Thursday, April 18, 2019 Census: Maricopa County – again – saw country’s biggest population gains WASHINGTON – Maricopa County again saw the largest population increase of any county in the nation last year, adding 81,244 residents to make eight straight years of gains, according to figures released Thursday by the Census Bureau. The county was the driving force behind a 122,770-person increase in Arizona’s population, which hit 7.17 million last year, according to the bureau’s yearly population estimates for counties and metro areas. David Plane, a University of Arizona geography and regional development professor, said the numbers are not surprising because “all the action has been in the biggest metro areas.” “The millennials love big metros, and Phoenix gets growth both from snowbird retirees as well as labor-force-age people, from California in particular,” Plane said. That move toward big urban areas was evident in the numbers for the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale metro area, which added 96,268 residents last year, most of those from domestic migration according to the Census Bureau. The Phoenix area was second only to the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metro area, which added 131,767 people, mostly through natural population increases. Maricopa remained the fourth largest county in the U.S., with an estimated population of 4,410,824. Since the last complete census in 2010, the county has added 593,707 people, a 15.6% increase. Only Santa Cruz County saw its population...

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Surge of migrant families taps out CBP, strains community resources in El Paso

Julian Hernandez Thursday, April 18, 2019 Surge of migrant families taps out CBP, strains community resources in El Paso EL PASO – As the surge of migrant families at the border continues, federal officials and local organizations continue to struggle in their efforts to process and shelter all those arriving in El Paso in huge numbers. Although the temporary detention camp under the Paso Del Norte International Bridge has been closed and the people held there relocated, the Department of Homeland Security said a lack of resources is slowing the processing of flow of migrants. Israel Cabrera, the associate pastor at Caminos de Vida Church, said his congregation has been able to take in hundreds of migrant families over the several past weeks, but they don’t have enough resources to house them for more than a few days at a time. Despite the challenges, Cabrera says it is their mission to help the migrants, most of whom are from Central America. “We can’t change policy, but we can keep them from being homeless and on the street,” he said. In a letter last week , Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wrote that Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement “are not equipped to deal with the volume of vulnerable populations that are reaching our territory.” Homeland Security facilities are “maxed out,” she said, and the...

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Local group, with help of 3 veterans, removes graffiti from Florence boulders

Carissa Wigginton Thursday, April 18, 2019 Local group, with help of 3 veterans, removes graffiti from Florence boulders FLORENCE – Nicole and Justin Corey were driving the Florence-Kelvin Highway last year when they saw boulders – clusters and stacks of them – splattered with paint; one was entirely coated with a spray-painted red heart and the outline of a face. Florence residents remember when the rocks were free of defacement. For years before the Coreys intervened, those who stopped to gawk at the field of boulders saw “Ashley loves Matthew” and “So-and-so was here.” It took the Coreys one year to obtain all the tools to embark on a two-week project to blast the paint off the rocks. They’re the founders of Natural Restorations, a nonprofit they started four years ago that removes trash and graffiti from outdoor recreation and wilderness areas. In March, they spent two weeks with their dedicated restoration team, which is comprised of the Coreys and three contracted military veterans, cleaning up the much visited area. It all started when they spotted those boulders a year ago. “We feel that everyone should be able to come out into nature and enjoy this beautiful area with all the boulders without seeing profanity and people professing their love to their girlfriend or boyfriend on the rocks,” Nicole Corey said. Graffiti is an ongoing problem on public and...

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