Category: Cronkite News

Backers hope Route 66 ‘historic trail’ designation can drive tourism

Isaac Windes Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017 Backers hope Route 66 ‘historic trail’ designation can drive tourism WASHINGTON – Anyone who doubts the lure of Route 66 should talk to Winslow Chamber of Commerce CEO Bob Hall, who said that capitalizing on the historic highway was key to revitalization of the historic downtown. “Fifteen, 20 years ago the population was dwindling and we decided we had to do something,” Hall said. “We decided to fix our historic downtown, which is Route 66 – and we really saw the difference.” Lawmakers in Washington hope to repeat that success with a bill that would put Route 66 on the road to becoming a National Historic Trail. The bill, heard Wednesday by a House Natural Resources subcommittee, would put the more-than-2,400-mile road under the care of the National Park Service, returning signage to the road and letting it appear on maps as a historic road, among other changes. Bill Thomas, chairman of the Route 66 Road Ahead Partnership, told the committee that the road, sometimes called the “Mother Road,” has an important place in 20th century U.S. history. “In the 1920s, it exemplified freedom and movement,” Thomas said after the hearing. “In the 1940s, it was the primary military convoy to ship troops … and it became the destination for everyone’s favorite two-week vacation.” When it opened in 1926, the road from Chicago...

Read More

November 15, 2017 Newscast | Cronkite News

Staff Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017 November 15, 2017 Newscast | Cronkite News The latest on a Supreme Court same-sex wedding cake case and more The latest on a Supreme Court same-sex wedding cake case, Transgender Awareness Week, and how one company is educating the public on...

Read More

As NAFTA staggers, Arizona keeps pushing forward to maintain its trade relationship with Mexico

Andrea Jaramillo Valencia Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017 As NAFTA staggers, Arizona keeps pushing forward to maintain its trade relationship with Mexico PHOENIX ‒ As a border state, Arizona plays a dual role in some of President Donald Trump’s policy proposals. It wants the border to be shielded from drug smuggling and undocumented immigration, but still be open for trade with Mexico. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican who endorsed Trump during his campaign, has distanced himself from the president’s stance on the North American Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA. Trump called it “the worst trade deal” ever to be signed and has threatened to end it numerous times. When asked about the border wall in a radio interview earlier this year, Ducey said “a wall in certain places certainly benefits Arizona,” but he added that he wanted “to make sure that we maintain the relationship we have with our trading partners.” As the future of the trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada remains uncertain on a national level and negotiations don’t seem to be moving forward, Ducey’s administration is still pushing to continue the relationship with Mexico, Arizona’s main international trade partner. “Arizona doesn’t want to just sit on the sideline and see what happens,” Ducey said during his opening remarks at the Leading with Trade event in Phoenix last week with Mexico’s Ambassador to the U.S., Gerónimo...

Read More

Do you use Tonto National Forest? Officials want to hear from you

Tanner Stechnij Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017 Do you use Tonto National Forest? Officials want to hear from you MESA – Hunters, conservationists, hikers and campers are being courted by Tonto National Forest to help determine a future that balances preservation and tourism. See related coverage Annual Tonto Forest cleanup Proposed roundup at Tonto Forest Benefits, drawbacks of living on federally owned land The U.S. Forest Service asks people to offer views on a preliminary plan on how the forest will be used, preserved and managed, including discussing whether to limit target shooting and restrict the retrieval of big game. The proposal also emphasizes the importance of having Arizona native fish available for fishing, promoting conservation programs such as Leave No Trace , engaging diverse and historically underrepresented communities and offering year-round tourism activities, according to the 132-page document. Forest employees has been conducting open houses in communities throughout the Tonto National Forest, with the next public meeting planned for Wednesday afternoon in Young, Arizona. Several have already happened in the Phoenix metro area, with the last one planned for Nov. 21 in Phoenix. People who can’t attend one of the hearings can comment online by Dec 21 . At an early November hearing in Mesa, most of the dozens of people attending the open house represented the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group . Simone Netherlands, who heads the organization,...

Read More

Local Latino veterans come together to share art, hope to leave legacy of their service

Alex Valdez Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017 Local Latino veterans come together to share art, hope to leave legacy of their service PHOENIX – Memories of the battlefield were brought back to life at “Los Veteranos De Arizona ” art exhibit. Those behind the show said the idea behind it is to serve as a platform for local Latino veterans to come together and share their stories of war through art. In honor of Veterans Day, The Sagrado Galleria , an art gallery located in South Phoenix, hosted the event. Two of the artists featured at “Los Veteranos de Arizona” talk to exhibit visitors. (Photo By Alex Valdez/ Cronkite News) In an area where art is rare, visitors were shown war-battles, brotherhood and history through the eyes of the men and women who were called to live a life of service. Jim Covarrubias is a Vietnam veteran and an organizer of the showcase. “When I was in the military, there was a lot of Latinos in there and they did a good job. We did a good job,” he said. Through the art he created, Covarrubias wanted to share the important role Latino service members have had through the years in the military. “We are proud to be veterans and be part of the history. But we want respect,” Covarrubias said. Respect and honor were components weaved in and out...

Read More