Category: Cronkite News

Feds no longer collect school shooting data, advocates left to scramble

Kyley Schultz Monday, April 23, 2018 Feds no longer collect school shooting data, advocates left to scramble WASHINGTON – When a 14-year-old fatally shot himself in a Coronado K-8 Elementary School bathroom on Jan. 9, the incident was announced by the Sierra Vista Unified School District and the Cochise County Sheriff’s Department. But it did not show up in any larger school system database. Had it occurred two years earlier, the shooting would have been recorded in a U.S. Department of Education database on firearm incidents in schools. But the department’s Office of Civil Right stopped collecting such reports after the 2015-16 school year. The office gave no reason for its decision when it announced it would no longer collect “firearms incidents” reports, and repeated calls to the office for comment were not returned. The lack of a standard database has left advocates scrambling at a time when specific and organized data on firearms is “critical to understanding how, when, and why these incidents occur.” “I think the reason there is so much debate about how often school shootings occur is because we don’t have a federal source that is providing updated and accurate information with an agreed-upon definition,” said Kelly Drane, a public health research associate for Giffords, the gun-safety coalition. “It’s not just collecting the right data, it’s creating a definition that we can use and all...

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Swinging for the fences: Chandler bat company finds it way to major leagues

Hunter Robinson Monday, April 23, 2018 Swinging for the fences: Chandler bat company finds it way to major leagues CHANDLER — With Major League Baseball back in action, the crack of a wooden bat returns as one of the soundtracks of summer. Some of that sound is courtesy of Valley-based Zinger Bats. The company provides bats for all levels of baseball, including the major leagues. “I’ve enjoyed them,” Diamondbacks pitcher Zack Godley said. “They don’t necessarily work for me — but that’s not the bat’s fault, that’s me — but as far as feel and stuff during (batting practice), I love them.” Zinger Bats originated in Utah but relocated to Arizona in 2012 when Scott Hanish bought the company and moved it to the area where he was born and raised. “Utah is a great place (but) there isn’t as much baseball there as there is here,” Hanish said. “During spring training you could walk in (the shop) and there could be 10 to 15 pro guys looking around. There is always baseball here. … Not a bad place to have a bat company.” Hanish, who played collegiate and independent league baseball, received a few old bats one day by a former major leaguer. They came from Zinger Bats and he remembers thinking they were the best he had ever used. A few years later, he received a call...

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Photo series: Entrepreneurs in their element

Skyler Snider Monday, April 23, 2018 Photo series: Entrepreneurs in their element The 2017 Kauffman Index of Growth Entrepreneurship report found that young companies create an average of 3 million new jobs every year and have been responsible for almost all new net job creation in the United States over the past 40 years. And although such areas as Silicon Valley, New York City and Boston are generally regarded as entrepreneurial hubs for their high rate of venture investment, other cities across the country are showing significant entrepreneurial growth – and Phoenix is one of them. According to a 2018 study conducted by Fit Small Business , the Phoenix area is one of the top 15 most entrepreneurial areas in the United States, producing 380 new business owners out of 100,000 adults each month. Metro Phoenix made the list for its growth in the following categories: startup density; rate of new entrepreneurs; opportunity share of new entrepreneurs; venture capital; investment in the city; tax friendliness to small businesses; business as the primary source of income for local entrepreneurs; infrastructure and pollution; annual payroll number of firms with paid employees; and number of of nonemployer firms. Below, our photo series highlights more than 20 metro Phoenix entrepreneurs – their triumphs and challenges, and why basing their businesses and careers in Phoenix helps them thrive. DIANA VOWELS General Manager, Galvanize Phoenix...

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Domestic abuse is the new realm of concussion studies

Tristan Ettleman Monday, April 23, 2018 Domestic abuse is the new realm of concussion studies PHOENIX — Concussions in athletes have received attention in recent years, but experts are now looking to also address the needs of a large, yet overlooked, population – domestic abuse victims. One in three women and one in four men have been physically abused by an intimate partner in their lifetime. There are 10 million victims of domestic abuse a year, of which 76 percent are women, said Dr. Glynnis Zieman of the Barrow Neurological Institute. And that number is underreported, she added. Most of the blows from an abuser are to one of the most vulnerable parts of the body and, over years of daily and weekly incidents, those hits take a toll. “In a domestic violence situation, a lot of the abuse is focused on the head,” said Jonathan Lifshitz, director of the Translational Neurotrauma Research Program at the University of Arizona. Lifshitz said that football players, who encounter significant blows but are supported by on-hand medical assistance at games and in the off-season, have a different brain-injury reality than abuse victims. “Where does this woman go? She has to live it. The opportunity for recovery is very different,” he said. Brain injury research has followed soldiers after combat and professional athletes but the subjects have been mostly male, Zieman said. Researchers...

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Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey

Fortesa Latifi and Jenna Miller Saturday, April 21, 2018 Students deem ‘die-in’ gun-control protest successful despite lack of response from Gov. Ducey PHOENIX – Three high schoolers filed into the waiting room outside Gov. Doug Ducey’s office at 4:17 p.m. They lay down on the floor and settled in, with a plan to wait until one of two things happened: either authorities would arrest them or Ducey would agree to meet with them. In the lobby of the House of Representatives and the Senate, about 100 other activists were doing the same thing. They had organized the protest for Friday, the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. It was part of a national effort for gun control born out of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida. In the waiting room outside Ducey’s office, two other students joined the “die-in” 15 minutes later. Dawn Motley, a junior at Mountain View High School, lay on the floor with her hands crossed over her chest. She held a Constitution tightly between her fingers. The Friday night “die-in” made national headlines, drawing attention to the students’ cause. It didn’t, however, spur Ducey to action. Ducey, a Republican up for re-election this year, on Saturday released a statement through a spokesman that did not address the Friday protest, but it mentioned the governor’s “Safe Arizona Schools” plan. [su_divider top=”no” size=”2″ margin=”10″] Related Stories...

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