Category: Cronkite News

Rosen remains confident, Wilks realistic as Cardinals’ broken offense takes center stage

Harley Yearout Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018 Rosen remains confident, Wilks realistic as Cardinals’ broken offense takes center stage TEMPE – A win against the San Francisco 49ers two weeks ago seemed to give the Arizona Cardinals a ray of hope. It was rookie quarterback Josh Rosen’s first win as a starter and gave coach Steve Wilks his first win as an NFL head coach. But a 27-17 loss to the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday has questions about the production of the offense and the job security of offensive coordinator Mike McCoy swirling. “We’ve got to do everything we can right now to get this offense going in the right direction,” Wilks said Monday. The loss dropped the team to 1-5 and exposed a plethora of offensive issues. Arizona’s offense ranks dead last in total yardage with 1,323 yards through six games. The lack of output has led to questions about McCoy’s job security. “I would say all our jobs are in jeopardy, including mine, if we don’t win,” Wilks said. Even with all the noise on the outside about the coaching staff, Rosen remains confident in his unit and realizes the issues they need to address. “Third down obviously is the glaring issue,” Rosen said. “But I think that’s just cause of a microcosm of the greater issue. I don’t think it’s one big elephant in the room. I...

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The cost of drought: Less water from Lake Mead in 2020, higher rates for consumers

Corey Hawk Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018 The cost of drought: Less water from Lake Mead in 2020, higher rates for consumers LAKE MEAD – Swaths of mineral-stained white rock, more than 100 feet tall, mark Lake Mead’s basin, punctuating decades of drought in the Southwest. At one point, the white rock was underwater. If the lake levels dip too low, Arizona could lose about a seventh of its annual water allotment to the Central Arizona Project, which supplies much of the state’s water. Water experts said that could lead to farmers and homeowners paying higher water rates and prioritize Arizona behind neighboring states in CAP water availability. Conservation may be key to keeping water in everyone’s taps in Arizona. Still, drought has some advantages. Visitors to Lake Mead this fall were excited about the rocky islands and hundreds of miles of beaches that otherwise would be submerged. “If you want to go to a nice sandy beach and hang out with 25 boats and 150 people, then the water level isn’t an issue,” said Clifford Denning. He and his wife, Cheri, stood on the shore of Lake Mead, which they have been visiting for seven years. “We encourage anyone to come out, enjoy it while you can. It’s here, it’s great, it’s beautiful,” Cheri Denning said. Prolonged drought stalks Arizona The dark side of low-water levels could mean cutoffs...

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Taking it one class at time: Arizona ‘dreamers’ find it hard to afford college after court ruling

Abdel Jimenez Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018 Taking it one class at time: Arizona ‘dreamers’ find it hard to afford college after court ruling PHOENIX – Saray Escobar Gomez dreams of becoming a teacher and is just three courses shy of completing her associate’s degree at Paradise Valley Community College. However, as a DACA recipient, Gomez said it will take her longer to complete that degree after the Arizona Supreme Court’s April 2018 ruling that DACA recipients – who also are known as Dreamers – are ineligible for in-state tuition, leaving many of them with few options and resources for the school year. “I had to cut my time as a full-time student,” Gomez said. “It slowed me down.” She attends one of the Maricopa Community Colleges, where tuition for the school year is $326 per credit hour for non-residents compared with $85 per credit for Maricopa County residents. “My mother … and I join what we earn together, and that’s how we make it,” Gomez said, referring to getting financial support from her mom to finish her degree. DACA – the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – is a Barack Obama-era policy that protects from deportation young immigrants who were brought to this country as children. It was implemented in 2012 after Congress failed to pass the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Last month,...

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Oct. 15, 2018 Newscast | Cronkite News

Staff Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018 Oct. 15, 2018 Newscast | Cronkite News We look at how DACA recipients are figuring out to how to pay for college after courts ruled to cut their in-state tuition; how Arizona is working to make voting machines secure and accurate; and...

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Trump will visit Arizona, first time since 2017 rally aftermath

Adriana Falero and Jimmie Jackson Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 Trump will visit Arizona, first time since 2017 rally aftermath PHOENIX — When President Donald Trump touches down in Mesa on Friday to stump for Arizona senatorial candidate Martha McSally, the setting will be much different from the aftermath of 2017 rally in Phoenix that led to police firing tear gas at a crowd of protesters and a class-action lawsuit. Trump will rouse a crowd at 7 p.m. Friday at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport to support Republican McSally, a two-term member of Congress who’s running against Democrat Kyrsten Sinema, a three-term member of Congress. McSally embraced Trump when she launched her campaign and he returned the gesture when she won the Republican primary. Trump, who has trumpeted his endorsement as key to Republicans triumphing in the November midterm elections, is bullish about his impact on a crowd. He has made several visits to Arizona, where a majority voted for him as president. “The crowds at my Rallies are far bigger than they have ever been before, including the 2016 election,” Trump tweeted on Monday. Doors will open at 4 p.m. for the free rally , with tickets were available on his website. The crowds at my Rallies are far bigger than they have ever been before, including the 2016 election. Never an empty seat in these large venues, many thousands of...

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