Category: Cronkite News

Glendale Fire Department leads disaster drill training

Ben Margiott Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Glendale Fire Department leads disaster drill training The Glendale Fire Department led disaster drill training for local students at Landmark Middle School as students spent 21 hours of time in the classroom learning about proper preparations for how to handle disasters. (Video by Ben Margiott/Cronkite News).embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Walmart coworkers in Phoenix honored for performing CPR

Lauren Michaels Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Walmart coworkers in Phoenix honored for performing CPR In February, Walmart coworkers Brent Anderson and Cathy Villa performed CPR on a colleague suffering from a heart attack until firefighters arrived on scene. The pair was honored for their life-saving efforts by the Phoenix Fire Department on Wednesday. (Video by Lauren Michaels/Cronkite News).embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Sen. Jeff Flake: States should determine primary responses to drought

Travis Arbon Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Sen. Jeff Flake: States should determine primary responses to drought U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona, said he believes there is a chance the U.S. Congress will move forward with legislation addressing drought in the West, but any federal response to water shortages must not overrule state policies or rely on federal funding. Flake spoke at the 2016 Business of Water Summit in Phoenix, where local government and business leaders convened to discuss the future of water sustainability in the Southwest. Attendees from Colorado, Arizona and California streamed into the Hyatt Regency Phoenix hotel for the two-day conference. The Colorado River Basin faces a 16-year drought that has led to tightening belts as the swelling population of western states increases strain on the river’s resources. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the combined population of California, Arizona and Colorado has grown about 19 percent since 2000, from about 43.3 million to more than 51.4 million people. Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of the Interior said the Colorado River system – Arizona’s largest water source – is experiencing its driest period in the last 100 years. Flake said he has been working on federal legislation to address the issue, but those measures remain trapped in congressional gridlock. One proposal would extend the Colorado River system’s conservation pilot program and allow the Department of the Interior to...

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First Zika virus case emerges in Arizona

Kendall Bartley Wednesday, March 30, 2016 First Zika virus case emerges in Arizona The first case of Zika virus in Arizona has been confirmed in a woman who traveled outside the country before returning to Arizona, health officials have confirmed. Arizona Department of Health Services said the woman, after returning from her visit to a country where the Zika virus is found, fell ill and visited a doctor. The tests confirmed she was infected with the virus and was told to stay inside to avoid being bitten by a mosquito. Jessica Rigler, bureau chief for DHS epidemiology and disease control, said the virus remains in a person’s blood two to seven days. During that time a mosquito could bite an infected person and then transfer the virus to an uninfected person. Rigler said the risk of others contracting Zika “is very, very low in Maricopa County as well as the rest of Arizona.” A mosquito bite and sexual intercourse with an infected person are the two known ways to contract the virus. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Johnny Diloné, spokesman for Maricopa County Environmental Services, said people are more likely to die of flu than the Zika virus. Still, it is a serious...

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Athletes For Life helps combat obesity, heart disease

Elena Mendoza Wednesday, March 30, 2016 Athletes For Life helps combat obesity, heart disease Noe Crespo has made it his ‘lifetime mission’ to give back to low-income communities by leading people to a healthier lifestyle. Crespo, a nutrition professor at Arizona State University, oversees the Athletes for Life research program for families. It focuses on exercise and nutrition education to fight childhood and adult obesity, which can lead to diabetes and heart disease. “It’s important for families to have access to programs that promote healthy lifestyles,” Crespo said. “We know that among under-served families, minority populations and low income families there is a disproportional burden of chronic disease.” “I’m passionate about it because I, also, kind of grew up in under-served circumstances,” he said. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said nearly one in three Arizonans are overweight, triple the amount who were overweight 25 years ago. Athletes For Life is designed to turn around that alarming trend by involving parents and their children, ages 6 to 11, in exercise and nutrition programs. “At a young age, that’s when the habits start forming,” said Justin Smith, an ASU research assistant. “Getting them exposed to things that they weren’t exposed to before will hopefully influence their future decisions.” Crespo said the program could not be done without the hard work of students from ASU’s School of Nutrition and...

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