Category: Cronkite News

Phoenix passes anti-tethering law to protect dogs

Christina Tetreault Friday, June 3, 2016 Phoenix passes anti-tethering law to protect dogs PHOENIX — Dog owners will have to treat pets well under a new anti-tethering law in Phoenix pushed by animal-rights advocates. “Every year we have animals who die on a tether because they couldn’t reach water or they couldn’t reach shade,” said Chris West, field operations manager for the Arizona Humane Society . The new law prohibits tethering animals with a rope, chain or leash that is 10 feet or less to a stationary object and then walking away. Animals can’t be tethered at all during a storm, below freezing temperatures or when the heat exceeds 100 degrees. Violators will be fined for a first offense but can be charged criminally, with a misdemeanor, on a second offense. The law takes effect July 1. Phoenix City Councilwoman Thelda Williams and the humane society teamed up to create the restrictions. The city council approved the new law on Wednesday. “One of the problems that they run into are dogs that were on a rope or chain and wrapped around a pole or tree who had no access to water food or shade,” Williams said. The humane society’s emergency task force receives about 50 calls a day in the summer about animal cruelty, West said. He added the new ordinance is another tool for the organization and police...

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Cronkite News Refresh: June 3, 2016

Staff Friday, June 3, 2016 Cronkite News Refresh: June 3, 2016 Our Refresh show highlights the week’s top stories. We report on Lake Mead, wild fires and the latest technology. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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After 20 years, WNBA still struggles for media exposure

Landon Brown Friday, June 3, 2016 After 20 years, WNBA still struggles for media exposure PHOENIX — Twenty seasons. Many doubted the WNBA would be around that long when the women’s professional basketball league began play in 1997. “In the beginning, a lot of people didn’t take women’s basketball seriously,” Phoenix Mercury center Brittney Griner said. “They thought it was a joke.” But the league’s early stars gave it credibility, and this year, the WNBA plays its 20th season. “The WNBA was aided in being established by the Olympics because of Lisa Leslie and Sheryl Swoopes,” said Ann Meyers Drysdale, a Basketball Hall of Famer and Mercury vice president. Swoopes and Leslie were two of the key players on the 1996 U.S. Olympic gold medal women’s basketball team, and both went on to play in the WNBA. “They went around the world playing,” Meyers Drysdale said. “That was our first ‘Dream Team.’” Meyers Drysdale was the first overall pick by one of the WNBA’s predecessors, the Women’s Professional Basketball League, in 1978. That league folded in 1981, unable to overcome league debt and popularity hurdles. Unlike the WBL, the WNBA has stuck around, allowing today’s players to grow up knowing playing women’s professional basketball in the United States was a possibility. “With more talent and games being on television, a lot of these young gals saw the league play,”...

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3D-printed heart help family cope with toddler’s lifetime of heart surgeries

Christina Tetreault Friday, June 3, 2016 3D-printed heart help family cope with toddler’s lifetime of heart surgeries PHOENIX – Just days after she was born, Jemma Starks nearly died. Surgeons have operated on her three times over her 2 ½ years to keep her heart beating. As she prepares for a fourth open-heart surgery, the toddler plays with a color-coded 3D-printed heart that is a replica of the heart beating inside her chest. She wiggles in and out of her mother’s lap, chewing purple bubblegum, and explains, in the enthusiastic tones of a toddler, the different chambers of the 3D heart. “It’s the pink thing!” she squeals as her mother, Stephanie Starks, smiles. Starks remembers driving by a hospital at Thomas Road and State Route 51, and hoping she would never have to take her children there. “Please, let me never have to visit Phoenix Children’s Hospital,” she prayed. Jemma Starks, 2 1/2 years old, points out her heart defect on a 3D printed replica. Her mother, Stephanie Starks, was shocked to learn Jemma had congential heart disease. (Photo by Christina Tetreault/Cronkite News) Then, October 8, 2013, Jemma was born, the third daughter in the Starks family. She seemed fine. Perfect. Until a day later, when Jemma had trouble breathing. She was rushed to the cardiology department of Phoenix Children’s, where her anxious parents learned she had a congenital...

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Cronkite News Quiz: June 3, 2016

Cronkite News Staff Friday, June 3, 2016 Cronkite News Quiz: June 3, 2016 Did you follow the news closely this week? Take this short quiz and find out just how well you’ve been following our coverage of the latest news across Arizona and the...

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