Category: Cronkite News

New downtown Phoenix arena could bring end to Coyotes’ bumpy desert road

Michael Nowels Wednesday, July 15, 2015 New downtown Phoenix arena could bring end to Coyotes’ bumpy desert road When the Winnipeg Jets moved to the desert and became the Phoenix Coyotes in 1996, it was a bold statement, part of the NHL’s efforts in the 1990s to place hockey in markets previously believed untenable. Ice hockey in the desert? To some, it seemed totally unsustainable. “To support four major franchises is not the easiest thing in the world, and I think it’s going to be a little bit more difficult than people estimate,” then-Suns star Charles Barkley told the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. before the Coyotes arrived in Phoenix. The Coyotes’ 19-year odyssey in the desert has indeed been difficult, especially since the team moved to Glendale in late 2003. While the franchise’s ownership group says it is committed to the Valley, criticism of the team’s long-term viability in Arizona has grown. With the Glendale City Council having voted to void its 15-year, $225 million lease agreement with the team, the Coyotes could be left searching for a new home, pending the outcome of an ongoing legal battle. How we got here The Coyotes played at US Airways Center, along with the Suns, from the time they arrived in the Valley until partway through the 2003-04 season, when they moved to a new arena in Glendale with an agreement that...

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When keeping secrets is your job, getting help is a problem for some veterans

Soyenixe Lopez Tuesday, July 14, 2015 When keeping secrets is your job, getting help is a problem for some veterans WASHINGTON – Sgt. Daniel Somers’ work in Iraq was classified, so when he returned from the war and sought treatment for traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder he balked at a care in a group setting. Somers, afraid he might reveal classified information, asked the Department of Veterans Affairs in Phoenix for individual care. After two years with no resolution from the VA, Somers took his own life in 2013. “No veteran or family should go through the same tragedy that the Somers family experienced,” said Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Phoenix, testifying in support of a bill aimed at helping veterans like Somers get the care they need. The Classified Veterans Access to Care Act would require the VA to ensure that covered veterans have access to mental health treatment, and that VA employees get guidance on how to properly deal with veterans in classified settings. It would also let veterans with classified experiences identify themselves so they can get the appropriate care as quickly as possible. Sinema’s bill was one of 13 bills heard Tuesday by a friendly House Veterans Affairs subcommittee, two leaders of which are co-sponsors on her bill. Sinema choked up briefly as she told the story of Somers, a Humvee machine-gunner who “ran over...

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Reaction to proposed Iran deal is swift, and split, from Arizona lawmakers

Nihal Krishan Tuesday, July 14, 2015 Reaction to proposed Iran deal is swift, and split, from Arizona lawmakers WASHINGTON – It took more than 20 months of negotiations to reach agreement on an Iranian nuclear deal, but it took mere hours for Arizona lawmakers to respond to the plan, with support falling along party lines. What Democrats heralded as a historic breakthrough in diplomacy, promising a safer, more peaceful Iran in years to come, Republicans called a “historic mistake” that would only fuel, not restrict, Iran’s nuclear and violent ambitions. President Barack Obama early Tuesday announced the multination agreement that he said would significantly decrease Iran’s nuclear capabilities for the next 15 years in exchange for gradually lifting trade and financial sanctions against that country. The plan also calls for Iran to give up large parts of its uranium stockpile and uranium-enrichment capabilities, which will constantly be monitored by inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency. Congress will have 60 days after it receives the agreement to review it, but cannot amend it: The deal is only subject to an up or down vote. Congress is scheduled to be on recess for the month of August. Critics note that the restrictions on nuclear power would end within 10 to 15 years and that the Iranian government fundamentally cannot be trusted regardless of its promises. “Ultimately, the problem with this...

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Mexico soccer fans celebrate team in Arizona against backdrop of Trump visit

Michael Nowels Tuesday, July 14, 2015 Mexico soccer fans celebrate team in Arizona against backdrop of Trump visit GLENDALE – The Valley of the Sun echoed with shouts from those with Mexican heritage this weekend, but the exclamations came from separate sections of the shouters’ psyches. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump spoke Saturday in Phoenix, bringing his controversial immigration sentiments with him. Roughly 4,000 people packed the Phoenix Convention Center, wondering what the multibillionaire would say next, while hundreds of protesters picketed outside. A day later, across the Valley, roars for Mexico shook Glendale’s University of Phoenix Stadium as more than 60,000 fans filled the venue for Mexico’s 0-0 draw with Guatemala in the group stage of the CONCACAF Gold Cup. Lalo Rosales, a Mexico fan at Sunday’s match, took a breath between cheers to speak unprompted about Trump. “I’d love to sit down with Donald Trump. If Donald Trump shared a taco with me and a beer – well, maybe a couple beers – he would know my perception,” he said. “He might not agree but he’d know it.” In a speech last month announcing his intention to run for president, Trump made some incendiary remarks about immigration from Mexico. “They’re sending people that have lots of problems and they’re bringing their problems with us,” Trump said. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists and some, I...

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