Category: Cronkite News

Arizona athletes take aim at 2016 Olympic Games

Kendall Pope Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Arizona athletes take aim at 2016 Olympic Games MyKayla Skinner’s siblings got her started in gymnastics. “They would do skills with me in the house and put me up on a bar,” Skinner said. “I would do chin-ups on it and do crazy stuff like that so my mom finally put me in it.” As a kid, sprinter Jamol James aspired “to be somebody great.” Both hope their humble beginnings lead to the 2016 Rio Olympics. Skinner is looking to take the final step to a berth on the U.S. women’s gymnastics team at the Olympic Trials in June in San Jose, California. After years of competing as a young girl, Skinner quit the sport. But her mom convinced her to resumed training when Carly Patterson won the gold medal in the 2004 Olympics. “I’m glad she did because otherwise I never would have had this opportunity,” Skinner said. Skinner was so talented, her coaches told her she needed advanced training. She joined Desert Lights when she was 11. “Then it just happened from there,” said her mom, Kym. Desert Lights Gymnasium is where Lisa Spini became Skinner’s main coach and has since molded her into one of the top gymnasts in the world. “She can twist and flip multiple times and she knows exactly where she is, and that’s an incredible asset...

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Arizona Republican Party to elect delegates for the National Convention

Jackie Padilla Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Arizona Republican Party to elect delegates for the National Convention This year’s presidential candidates are eager to earn the votes of the American people. But in order to secure a spot in the general election, they must have support from majority of delegates at the National Convention. Typically delegates consist of former governors, and other statewide officials. But many more people are eligible, according to the spokesperson for the Arizona Republican Party, Tim Sifert. “Any registered Republican voter is eligible to be a national delegate and is also eligible to be a delegate to the state convention,” Sifert said. For this year’s election, the process started back in 2014, when the Republic Committee elected Precinct Committeemen. This group represents each of the 30 local districts in the state and are responsible for electing the 1,251 delegates who will go to the State Convention on April 30th. From there, those selected cast their vote for a total of 58 delegates who will attend the National Convention in July, and with a majority vote, elect a candidate to represent their party in the primary election. For the first round of votes, delegates are bound by law to “vote for the winner of the primary in Arizona, also known as the preference election,” Sifert said. So by default, Donald Trump will sweep those ballots, but that...

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Four things legal drinkers need to know about using vertical IDs to buy alcohol in Arizona

Johnny Soto Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Four things legal drinkers need to know about using vertical IDs to buy alcohol in Arizona Vertical driver’s licenses are now accepted as valid identification in Arizona for out-of-state residents 21 years old and older who want to buy alcohol, ending a nearly 21-month ban and bringing relief to customers and business owners. The Arizona Department of Liquor License and Control received daily complaints from consumers demanding change, according to Lee Hill, assistant director. And businesses that depend on tourism also were losing money. Jose Perez, manager of Gringo Star in Tempe, said most of his customers are from out-of-state and the bar lost revenue in the couple of months before the law took effect April 5. “It was rough. We had a lot of customers just turn around and walk away even though they were just visiting,” Perez said. Here are four things you need to know about using vertical licenses to purchase liquor at stores and restaurants: 1. Only out-of-state customers can use the vertical IDs Businesses can accept vertical and horizontal ID cards from out-of-state patrons. But for an Arizona resident, only horizontal IDs work; those with vertical IDs can still be denied purchase. (Vertical licenses in Arizona are issued to minors). 2. Once an Arizona resident turns 21, a key deadline looms An Arizona resident who turns 21 and...

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Arizona Democratic delegation to national convention shaping up

Ben Margiott Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Arizona Democratic delegation to national convention shaping up With the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia exactly three months away, Arizona’s Democratic delegation is finally starting to take shape. The Democrats chose 50 of their allotted 85 delegates to July’s convention at district-level caucuses on April 16. Steven Slugocki, the Maricopa County Democratic party chair, was chosen to be a delegate for Hillary Clinton. “We had to promote ourselves, say why we were the best representatives, we had to give a speech, then through rounds of voting, that’s how we were elected,” said Slugocki, a first-time delegate. Twenty-eight of the state’s congressional district delegates are bound to vote for Hillary Clinton and 22 for Bernie Sanders, based on the results of the March 22 presidential preference election. Of the remaining 35 delegates, 16 are at-large delegates and nine are party leaders and elected officials (PLEO), all of which will be chosen on May 14 at the state committee meeting. The final 10 are super-delegates, made up of Arizona’s four Democratic representatives and six Democratic National Committee members. The super-delegates aren’t pledged to a candidate and could potentially still be swayed to a different candidate. Karyn Lathan, a Bernie Sanders delegate from congressional district 9, believes some super-delegates might still be up for grabs. “I think there are some people who are Hillary and who...

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Gila Monster genome project uses crowdfunding to learn the reptile’s secrets

Nick Pope Wednesday, April 27, 2016 Gila Monster genome project uses crowdfunding to learn the reptile’s secrets The Gila monster is a unique reptile that is native to Arizona, and now two ASU professors are attempting to learn more about it. “A Gila monster is the largest lizard that lives in the United States,” said Melissa Wilson Sayers, a computational Biologist at ASU. “It is one of only two venomous lizards in the world.” Wilson Sayers started a crowd-funding page in early April, looking to create a reference genome for the animal. Her collaborator, Dale Denardo, an environmental physiologist at ASU, says the genome would give them further knowledge of the Gila monster’s unique traits. “The genome is a tool that enables you to look at several different things,” said Denardo. “Types of genes that are activated, which genes they have, and how they compare to other species. There are a lot of things that can be accomplished by looking at the genome.” While Denardo has been studying the Gila monster for years, and says that it can provide further knowledge of other animals as well. “I started getting interested and I realized there actually a great study system, to really understand how animals balance resource needs,” Denardo said. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed {...

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