Category: Cronkite News

Arizonans join thousands rallying at Supreme Court for abortion case

Katie Bieri Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Arizonans join thousands rallying at Supreme Court for abortion case WASHINGTON – Arizonans were among the thousands of pro-life and pro-choice supporters who rallied outside the Supreme Court on Wednesday, as it took up one of the most-divisive issues for the court and the country. The justices were considering a challenge to a Texas law that imposes strict medical regulations on abortion clinics, requiring that clinics meet standards of an ambulatory surgical center and that clinic doctors have privileges at a hospital no more than 30 miles away. Supporters say the law is meant to protect women. But critics – including those chanting “Stop the sham!” in front of the Supreme Court Wednesday – say the law would end up closing three-quarters of the abortion clinics in the state. They see the law as little more than a thinly disguised attempt to restrict abortion access. “I feel like it’s very important to protect these rights, so it upsets me. It deeply upsets me,” said Karl Pederson, a Scottsdale native who was at the rally. “These rights have been guaranteed by the Supreme Court as a federal right to all women everywhere in the United States, and the fact that people are trying to limit that deeply upsets me,” he said. Pederson, a political science freshman at George Washington University, was in the midst...

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Cronkite News: March 2, 2016

Staff Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Cronkite News: March 2, 2016 This edition of Cronkite News takes an in-depth look at the 2016 presidential race, including analysis from in-studio guests..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Arizona is expected to continue national trend of high voter turnout

Audrey Weil Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Arizona is expected to continue national trend of high voter turnout In 2008, when Sen. John McCain ran for president, 51 percent of Arizonans voted in the presidential preference election. That was the highest turnout on record, and the Secretary of State’s Office said this year could be pretty close. “For the first time in a long time, Arizona really could be relevant in the presidential nomination process,” Director of Communications for the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office Matt Roberts said. He mentioned certain elements that generally attract a high voter turnout, like candidates in both parties competing for the nomination, several candidates still in the race, and an election date in the midst of excitement. “We’ve got it seems a perfect storm of those elements that could really improve turnout for us,” Roberts said. “There does seem to be a fair amount of enthusiasm but we’ll see if that actually translates into actual turnout.” Arizona presidential preference election turnout generally ranges from 30 to 50 percent, often lower than other state elections because registered independents can’t participate. But one group that could make a difference is millennials. “It’s hugely important. We have in this state huge issues when it comes to the discussion of education funding. Is there a more important group to talk to that has more impact than millennials on...

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Ford provides sneak peek of driverless vehicle

Travis Arbon and Ben Brown Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Ford provides sneak peek of driverless vehicle Ford Motor Co. showcased its version of an autonomous vehicle at an event at Phoenix co-working space CO+HOOTS on Wednesday. The company is testing a self-driving Fusion sedan at a facility in Wittmann, where the automaker also performs stress testing on its products. Ford is not alone. Driverless cars are the latest trend in the auto world, with Google, Tesla and others making forays into the space. Auto and tech companies are racing to be the first to tap into what management consulting firm Boston Consulting Group estimates will become a $42 billion market by 2025. Jim McBride, technical lead for autonomous vehicles for Ford, said the company wants to create a fully autonomous experience and go beyond systems that still require occasional input from the driver. Tesla’s version, for example, keeps cars within lanes while maintaining a constant speed, but it needs human intervention for stopping or signalling a lane change, according to azcentral.com. “We’re not going to ask the driver to intervene,” McBride said. “We just don’t think it’s a fair proposition to drive for many miles and suddenly it stops running and says ‘Hey, now it’s your turn.’” Ford’s prototype uses four cylindrical lidar sensors that sit atop the vehicle like a set of antennae. They produce a low humming...

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Report: Undocumented immigrants contribute $231 million in state taxes annually

Chloe Nordquist Wednesday, March 2, 2016 Report: Undocumented immigrants contribute $231 million in state taxes annually Undocumented immigrants pay an estimated $11.64 billion a year in taxes, according to a report by the Institution on Taxation and Economic Policy. Nearly $231.5 million of that amount is in state and local taxes for Arizona. The report released last Wednesday quantified undocumented immigrants’ state and local tax contributions and how they would change if the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants in the country were legalized. “The main reason for doing the report is that it’s been pretty clear for a number of years that some policymakers have strongly implied that undocumented families pay little or no taxes,” executive director of ITEP Matthew Gardner said. “This report is an effort to show that taxes paid by undocumented families are an awful lot more than zero.” The numbers in the report are based on estimated undocumented population numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau and tax calculations. There are currently an estimated 264,000 undocumented immigrants in Arizona. “If you think about an undocumented person who doesn’t bother submitting their tax return, they tend to pay more taxes,” ASU economics professor Timothy James said. Some undocumented immigrants may even be paying more than they need to by not claiming their tax return, according to Rodrigo Navarro García of the Phoenix Mexican Consulate. This unclaimed money...

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