Category: Cronkite News

Performance-tracking technology makes its way into youth sports

Mario Kalo Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015 Performance-tracking technology makes its way into youth sports When Dave Dengerink arrived at Texas Rush Soccer Club in Spring, Texas, as the youth soccer academy’s director of coaching and player development three years ago, he knew the kids possessed intangibles and skills few across the country owned. Many of them could already anticipate attacking methods, pursue the ball, intercept passes, and quickly initiate counterattacks. But he noticed one recurring issue: injuries. Dengerink turned to technology to combat the rash of injuries on his team and keep players fit. “This same group of girls I’m coaching last year had seven major injuries,” Dengerink said. “By major injuries, I’ll say an ACL tear or anything that has kept you out at least nine months. Since the implementation of (technology), I’ve had one.” Texas Rush Soccer Club uses Fit For 90, a science-driven player monitoring system aimed at preventing injuries through customized alerts about player readiness, muscle soreness and training load. The system has not made its way to Arizona youth sports yet, but local organizers see the potential it could bring. Fit For 90 was launched in 2013 by John Cone, former assistant coach with Major League Soccer club Sporting KC and director of sports science with the Portland Timbers. Cone, who has a doctorate in kinesiology, said the system was initially developed during his...

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Playing multiple sports can prevent young athletes from burning out

Cody Fincher Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015 Playing multiple sports can prevent young athletes from burning out Madison Woolgare balances two sports as a sophomore at Desert Vista High School, competitive cheer and swimming. “I definitely enjoy being able to participate in different things,” Woolgare said. “Because swim is more of an individual sport whereas cheer, I have my team. So I think you get both aspects of that. Also, the workout it gives you, too.” Athletes like Woolgare are becoming increasinglyhard to find, as pressure mounts to specialize in a single sport at a young age. “It’s becoming rare,” said Arizona State women’s basketball coach Charli Turner Thorne. “It’s the pressure from club coaches, and the parents kind of think, ‘Oh, if my kid’s going to get a scholarship, then I’ve got to get them to focus.’” .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Jennifer Lannon has had a front row seat for this trend as owner of AZ All-Stars Tumbling and Cheer in Tempe, where Woolgare cheers. “Nowadays, it’s so competitive and the parent has changed,” Lannon said. “The parent doesn’t drop off anymore. They drop off and they watch and they will put hundreds of thousands of dollars to make sure that their...

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Arizona is fastest growing state for youth hockey participation

Becca Winn Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015 Arizona is fastest growing state for youth hockey participation According to USA Hockey’s 2014-15 annual report, Arizona is the fastest growing state for youth hockey. Cronkite News reporter Rebecca Winn found out what factors may be contributing to the sudden growth of the sport in the Valley. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Cronkite News: Dec. 22, 2015

Staff Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015 Cronkite News: Dec. 22, 2015 This special edition of Cronkite News focuses on our top stories from the semester on the consumer and health beat..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Arizona charter schools turn 20 with higher test scores

James Anderson Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015 Arizona charter schools turn 20 with higher test scores Nestled between a taco shop, a gas station and a church lies the Gilbert campus of Leading Edge Academy. A former Albertsons grocery store on the strip mall is what the small public school calls home. Leading Edge’s campus is one of more than 600 charter schools in Arizona, which has been fostering the often misunderstood educational system for 20 years. “It’s kind of what I would call a hybrid model,” said Becki Krueger, Leading Edge’s business manager. “We’re a public-funded, privately run company, basically.” Charters receive per pupil funding from the state like traditional district public schools but differ in not being able to receive funding for facilities and cannot sell bonds and pass overrides. State law requires charters to admit applying students on a first-come-first-serve basis unlike private schools. “We are under the same rules as a district school. We cannot turn away students,” Krueger said. Charter school enrollment has steadily grown to more than 170,000 students since the State Legislature approved the school system in 1994. The state has just more than 1 million K-12 students in public schools. The goal of the charter school system, according to Arizona Charter Schools Association CEO Eileen Sigmund, is “to improve student achievement and provide parents a choice.” School choice is a popular idea...

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