Category: Cronkite News

Arizona PIRG Education Fund reminds consumers to be cautious while shopping this holiday season

Elenee Dao Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 Arizona PIRG Education Fund reminds consumers to be cautious while shopping this holiday season With Black Friday coming and Christmas in one month, buying toys will be at the top of the list for many parents. Toys can be fun for children, but they can also cause trouble. Anthony Pickett MD., an emergency room physician at Phoenix Children’s Hospital says that it is easy for kids to get hurt with toys. “Parents give toys to children that have many moving parts or sets of Lego’s and all it takes is for a split second – for a parent to look away and a child pops something in their mouth and it can easily be choked on.” He said. The Disney Pixar Finding Nemo Dory Figurine, for example, can break apart and the pieces become choking hazards, according to the annual study by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. The G2 Mini Football has a small piece that comes free. Slinky Jr. has too much chromium. As does the Minions Locking Pencil Case. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Every year, the Arizona Public Interest Research Group Education Fund releases the report listing toys that are potentially hazardous to...

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New app sends reports on police directly to ACLU

Angie Schuster Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 New app sends reports on police directly to ACLU Police body cameras have become more common in the past few years. Now a new app by the Arizona affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union lets the public film the police and send the report directly to the ACLU. The Mobile Justice A-Z app intends to serve as a check on abusive behavior by law enforcement. “The app is necessary in Arizona and really all across the country because what we’re seeing is that there are significant problems in police departments all over the country regarding excessive force and racial profiling,” said Steve Kilar, the communications director for the Arizona ACLU. The Mobile Justice A-Z app is free and allows you to record video and audio if you are stopped or questioned by law enforcement. You can then fill out a report and send it directly to the ACLU with your video via the app. “It encourages people to go out into their communities and when they see a potentially abusive police activity to record that activity,” Kilar said. The Phoenix Police Department, Arizona’s largest police department said they support technology that promotes transparency. In a statement, the department said: “If citizens wish to capture police contacts on video and share them with others, we encourage them to do so while keeping in...

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Cronkite News: Nov. 24, 2015

Staff Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 Cronkite News: Nov. 24, 2015 This edition of Cronkite News focuses on how an ACLU police app is keeping people safer in the Valley..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;...

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Black Lives Matter movement gains momentum in Chandler following church vandalism, theft

Becca Smouse Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 Black Lives Matter movement gains momentum in Chandler following church vandalism, theft A pastor was hoping to start a community conversation on racial equality when he and his predominantly white congregation installed a sign supporting the Black Lives Matter movement outside their Chandler church. Among the first people they heard from were vandals, who altered and then stole the sign. “(Congregation members) were sad, but not resigned,” said the Rev. Andy Burnette of the Valley Unitarian Universalists. “To see that it’s still controversial to say black lives matter saddened some of those folks.” A “Black Lives Matter” banner was hung in early November with more than 100 signatures from members of the congregation and the community showing their support, Burnette said. A few days later, the banner and the church were vandalized with signs that read “All Lives Matter.” A member of the congregation removed the signs to return the banner to its original state. Shortly after, the banner was then spray painted with the word “All” covering the word “Black.” Burnette said though he was prepared for the vandalism, the crime left the congregation with heavy hearts. And then the sign was stolen over the weekend of November 20. The banner was cut off of the three poles it hung from in front of the church. The congregation reported the theft to...

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New study: rooftop solar power saves water

Audrey Weil Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 New study: rooftop solar power saves water A new study claims Arizona could save more than 15 billion gallons of water a year if 20 percent of the state’s energy came from rooftop solar. That’s enough to sustain 90,000 homes, or the population of Chandler, for one year. The study was conducted by the former director of Arizona’s Department of Water Resources, Herb Guenther. He now serves as a water consultant and conducted this study for The Alliance for Solar Choice. Rooftop solar accounts for less than one percent of the state’s energy today. Nearly all of Arizona’s energy comes from thermal or hydro power plants. These plants average 685 gallons of water per megawatt-hour (MWh) of energy generated, while solar energy averages just two gallons of water per MWh. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } “Saving water is no longer an option. It’s an absolute necessity,” Guenther said. “And most people don’t realize that when you turn on the lights or the air conditioning, you’re also consuming water.” Environment America’s Solar Program coordinator Bret Fanshaw said attaining 20 percent solar power in Arizona is feasible. Environment America released a report last year predicting that by 2025, 25...

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