Category: Cronkite News

Opt-out bill advances in Arizona Senate

Sydnee Scofield Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 Opt-out bill advances in Arizona Senate Senate Bill 1455 passed in the Education Committee with a margin of 6-1 Thursday, but it still needs to come before the full Senate. It would allow parents to opt their kids out of the state standardized test and choose a different assessment. Currently, the AzMERIT is the test being used in Arizona schools, but opting out is difficult. “Last spring when I opted my 5th grade son out of the AzMERIT test, I was told by my child’s principal that he would have to sit and stare for hours in front of computer until the majority of students were done taking the test,” parent Sophia Cogan testified. The U.S. Department of Education is threatening to cut funding if enough students opt out. Senator Steve Smith (R-11) says he supports this bill anyway. “I hope and pray one day we can actually take back our dollars that we send Washington and allocate them in our state, for our children, the way we want to,” Smith said. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Up to this point, the federal government has never withheld money from schools that didn’t measure enough students. Though no...

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Retired master tailor stitched his way through racial boundaries

Elena Mendoza Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 Retired master tailor stitched his way through racial boundaries H. Shytel Glover never doubted himself, even as some doubted him. In the 1960s, when there were few African-American men in fashion, he fought his way to a pinnacle of the fashion world. His journey started years ago, thousands of miles from Arizona. Glover grew up in Harlem, New York, surrounded by people of different skin colors who shared his approach to life. How others might perceive he and his friends puzzled them. “They said, ‘Oh, those poor black people in Harlem.’ And we all looked at each other like, ‘Who are they talking about?’ because we didn’t grow up with that mindset.” He was a curious kid, one who wondered how things worked. One day, he took a clock apart. Then, his parents came home. They told him if he didn’t put it back together, he’d get ‘the whipping of a lifetime’. Under those orders, he put it back together. To his surprise, it worked. H. Shytel Glover during his High School of Fashion Industry days in New York, circa 1962. (Photo courtesy of H. Shytel Glover) From that moment he wanted to be a scientist. But when it came time to choose a career, his parents steered him in a different direction. To make his parents happy, he took the entry test...

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Spring training gives Diamondbacks fans sneak peek at new look

Bill Slane Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 Spring training gives Diamondbacks fans sneak peek at new look The Arizona Diamondbacks asked fans to “Join the Evolution” after releasing new uniforms in December. Turns out that evolution is not limited to one club. As fans make travel plans to attend spring training in Arizona and as the fan experience continues to evolve, MLB has made an effort to give fans the best spring training baseball they can offer. That includes a new set of uniforms for Cactus and Grapefruit League teams from Majestic. “We balanced the tradition of the sport with the needs and the wants of some of the teams that wanted to step out,” said Rob Grow, director of product for Majestic. In the past, teams in spring training usually wore what amounted to their practice jersey for games. The new uniforms from Majestic are styled more like the regular season uniforms. According to a release from MLB, the only significant differences are a road sign patch on the sleeve (an AZ for the Cactus League and an FL for the Grapefruit League) and an assortment of logos blended into the numbers on the back of the jerseys. Some teams, like the Chicago White Sox and Tampa Bay Rays, decided to make some changes from their traditional look by using alternative logos on their jerseys. For the Diamondbacks however,...

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Low Mexican Peso is generating more travel interest among Americans

Kaitlyn Ahrbeck Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 Low Mexican Peso is generating more travel interest among Americans With spring break just two weeks away, college students are taking a second look at Mexico as an ideal destination, thanks to its weak peso and despite travel alerts. The peso rebounded slightly this week following an announcement by the Mexican government that it will cut budget spending. The Bank of Mexico also raised interest rates in response to falling oil prices and global volatility that have sent the peso to all time lows against the dollars. Some analysts predict the rebound will be short lived. The peso’s value has fluctuated from 19.10 earlier in the week to about 18.40 Thursday, generating enthusiasm among students and Arizonans alike about traveling south. “You always hear ‘spring break in Mexico,’” said ASU sophomore Ryan Santistevan, 19. “The peso being low is a motivation to go.” Websites such as studentcity.com and springbreakcancun.com are creating flight packages and planned trips to Mexico specifically for college students for the 2016 spring break season. “I’m in a sorority, and almost all the girls are going to Cabo or Rocky Point for spring break,” said ASU journalism student Danielle McNally,19. “I always fly to Mexico. … I’m from California, and I would always fly with my family or friends.” According to the United States Department of Commerce, almost 7 million...

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Plan to protect 1.7 million acres at Grand Canyon claims new support

Sara Weber Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016 Plan to protect 1.7 million acres at Grand Canyon claims new support WASHINGTON – Backers of a bill that would create a new national monument on 1.7 million acres of federal land around the Grand Canyon touted a new survey Thursday that they said shows broad support for the plan. The telephone survey of likely voters across the state found 80 percent of respondents said they somewhat supported or strongly supported establishing the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument, while just 14 percent opposed and 6 percent had no opinion. “The political firestorm will be shrill, but it’s on strong legal ground,” said Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Tucson, who sponsored the bill to create the monument. “The poll helps us to … build support across Arizona and the rest of the nation.” A Grander Canyon An FM3 survey of likely Arizona voters on the proposed Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument found: 80 percent of those interviewed said they either strongly support or somewhat support establishing the monument. 48 percent said more needs to be done to protect the land, water and air surrounding the Grand Canyon. Women are “modestly more supportive,” with 83 percent of those polled saying they strongly or somewhat support the bill compared to 76 percent of men. 95 percent of Democrats polled said they strongly or somewhat support the...

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