Category: Cronkite News

New business incubator finds home in old pickle house building

Alexa D’Angelo Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015 New business incubator finds home in old pickle house building The number of Hispanic businesses in Arizona has grown by 70 percent in recent years, and a new Phoenix incubator, the Pickle House project, aims to help even more Latino entrepreneurs succeed. “I would have really benefitted from a space to work in,” Carla Chavarria said. “Starting your own business, you can’t work at home and don’t have the funds to rent a space so it’s great that (Chicanos por la Causa) is offering a workspace.” Chavarria, owner of YCM Marketing, a multicultural marketing firm focused on millennials, said she hopes this incubator will instill a want in the Hispanic community to become innovators. Chicanos por la Causa created the Pickle House project to offer consulting and modern technology to people looking to start their own businesses but who would otherwise would not have access to resources. The organization is using a $3 million grant from the Economic Development Administration and $50,000 from a workforce development competition to renovate the building that once housed a pickle distribution company. Some of the funds will pay to renovate Arnold’s Pickle House and turn the historical Phoenix building into a small-business incubator. “The family that owned Arnold’s Pickle House was about to sell, and we really liked the property,” said Andres Contreras, vice president of acquisition...

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Arizona municipalities offering free audits to conserve water

Ty Scholes Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015 Arizona municipalities offering free audits to conserve water GILBERT – Jeff Lee’s first stop at this home is the box holding the water meter. He furrows his brow upon finding the meter submerged. “Looks like the neighbor is overwatering, otherwise this would be dry,” he says. Draining the water with what looks like a giant syringe, he begins watching the meter with the home not using water. No leaks. As homeowner Jeremy Peters watches, Lee turns on the sprinklers, zone by zone, still watching the water meter. On his clipboard, he notes that they run longer than needed for this lawn. Walking around the yard, he points out that two sprinkler heads are too short, leaving puddles around them. Also, two drippers are close to the trunk of a mature tree when they should be hitting roots farther away. It will all be in a report that Lee, a water conservation specialist for the Town of Gilbert, will leave with Peters, whose wife requested the visit. “It takes an hour or so, but it’s worth it,” Lee said. “I think I’ve already found the culprit here.” With Arizona in the grip of a decades-long drought, Gilbert is among municipalities in the Phoenix metropolitan area offering free home water audits to reduce waste. Lee said Gilbert performs more than 300 audits a year. “If...

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In Guadalupe, one of the state’s smallest towns, residents push back against persistent poverty

Sonny Scott Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015 In Guadalupe, one of the state’s smallest towns, residents push back against persistent poverty GUADALUPE – Just 300 feet separate a meticulously manicured resort and golf course from the tiny town of Guadalupe, where 31 percent of its mostly Latino and Yaqui Indian population live in poverty and only about 54 percent of its children graduate from high school. According to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau numbers, Guadalupe is one of the poorest communities in Arizona. Its lack of thriving local businesses and its dilapidated houses and buildings illustrate the woes of the state’s Latino population in places where jobs are scarce and students struggle to stay in school. “Poverty is so vicious that it doesn’t allow people sometimes to get out from under its thumb,” said Joseph Garcia, director of the Latino Public Policy Center at Arizona State University’s Morrison Institute. “And people get so worn down, they don’t see the possibilities of how to escape poverty.” Create free infographics with Venngage !function(){var t=document.getElementById(“vgframe943”),e=document.getElementById(“vgdiv943″),n=function(){t.contentWindow.postMessage(e.offsetWidth,”*”),e.style.paddingBottom=e.offsetWidth*504/804+”px”};window.addEventListener(“resize”,n),window.addEventListener(“load”,n)}(); The National Center for Children in Poverty reports that about 400,000 children in Arizona – or 26 percent – are poor. “Arizona will drop to a second tier state and it could be on a permanent basis if we don’t correct it,” Garcia said. “Education is the great equalizer when you come out of poverty.” Guadalupe incorporated...

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Arizonans join throngs in, around White House for start of pope’s visit

Tom Blanton Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015 Arizonans join throngs in, around White House for start of pope’s visit WASHINGTON – She was looking at a pope and a president Wednesday, but Tucson resident Margarita Bernal said she could just as easily have been watching a “rock star” at the White House. Bernal was one of 11,000 ticketed guests on the South Lawn of the White House – and many thousands more lining the streets outside – for the first official stop of Pope Francis’ tour of the United States. “We waited for three hours,” Bernal said after the event. “There’s an aura about him that I could get from the bleachers … you could tell he is a very sweet man.” On a beautiful autumn morning in Washington, President Barack Obama welcomed the pope as a man who set a “profound moral example” for others. The pope, in brief remarks, said he looked forward to “these days of encounter and dialogue in which I hope to listen to and share many of the hopes and dreams of the American people.” Pope Francis used the opportunity to call for building a “tolerant and inclusive” society, protecting individual rights and safeguarding religious liberty, among other issues. He spent much of his speech talking about the need to address climate change, an issue that has proven controversial to some, including some Catholics....

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Catholic lawmakers talk about balancing private faith, public life

Charles McConnell Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015 Catholic lawmakers talk about balancing private faith, public life WASHINGTON – When the pope addresses a joint session of Congress in a history-making address Thursday, he will likely talk about hot-button issues like climate change and immigration. Catholic lawmakers say they will listen – but they won’t take the pope’s word as gospel. “Our form of government is not based on what religion you are, it’s based on the law of the land,” said Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Tucson. “It’s based on the Bill of Rights and it’s based on the Constitution. That’s what we swore allegiance to.” Grijalva, who said he’s looking forward to the pope’s speech, is one of five Catholics in the Arizona delegation and one of 164 Catholics in Congress, or about 30 percent of the House and Senate. Politicians and religion The religious affiliation of each member of Arizona’s congressional delegation, according to the Pew Center on Religion and Public Life. Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Arizona: Mormon Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona: Anglican/Episcopal Rep. Trent Franks, R-Glendale: Baptist Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Phoenix: Catholic Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Prescott: Catholic Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Tucson: Catholic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick, D-Flagstaff: Catholic Rep. Martha McSally, R-Tucson: Unspecified/Other (Protestant) Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Mesa: Mormon Rep. David Schweikert, R-Fountain Hills: Catholic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Phoenix: Unaffiliated Arizona lawmakers said in recent weeks that they may not always...

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